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### TABLE OF CONTENTS

- [NAME](#NAME)
- [SYNOPSIS](#SYNOPSIS)
- [DESCRIPTION](#DESCRIPTION)
- [FEATURE](#FEATURE)
- [REQUIREMENT](#REQUIREMENT)
- [INSTALLATION](#INSTALLATION)
- [POSTGRESQL-CONFIGURATION](#POSTGRESQL-CONFIGURATION)
- [LOG-STATEMENTS](#LOG-STATEMENTS)
- [PARALLEL-PROCESSING](#PARALLEL-PROCESSING)
- [INCREMENTAL-REPORTS](#INCREMENTAL-REPORTS)
- [BINARY-FORMAT](#BINARY-FORMAT)
- [JSON-FORMAT](#JSON-FORMAT)
- [AUTHORS](#AUTHORS)
- [LICENSE](#LICENSE)

### NAME

pgBadger - a fast PostgreSQL log analysis report

### SYNOPSIS

Usage: pgbadger \[options\] logfile \[...\]

    PostgreSQL log analyzer with fully detailed reports and graphs.

Arguments:

    logfile can be a single log file, a list of files, or a shell command
    returning a list of files. If you want to pass log content from stdin
    use - as filename. Note that input from stdin will not work with csvlog.

Options:

    -a | --average minutes : number of minutes to build the average graphs of
                             queries and connections. Default 5 minutes.
    -A | --histo-average min: number of minutes to build the histogram graphs
                             of queries. Default 60 minutes.
    -b | --begin datetime  : start date/time for the data to be parsed in log
                             (either a timestamp or a time)
    -c | --dbclient host   : only report on entries for the given client host.
    -C | --nocomment       : remove comments like /* ... */ from queries.
    -d | --dbname database : only report on entries for the given database.
    -D | --dns-resolv      : client ip addresses are replaced by their DNS name.
                             Be warned that this can really slow down pgBadger.
    -e | --end datetime    : end date/time for the data to be parsed in log
                             (either a timestamp or a time)
    -E | --explode         : explode the main report by generating one report
                             per database. Global information not related to a
                             database are added to the postgres database report.
    -f | --format logtype  : possible values: syslog, syslog2, stderr, jsonlog,
                             cvs, pgbouncer, logplex, rds and redshift. Use this
                             option when pgBadger is not able to detect the log
                             format.
    -G | --nograph         : disable graphs on HTML output. Enabled by default.
    -h | --help            : show this message and exit.
    -H | --html-outdir path: path to directory where HTML report must be written
                             in incremental mode, binary files stay on directory
                             defined with -O, --outdir option.
    -i | --ident name      : programname used as syslog ident. Default: postgres
    -I | --incremental     : use incremental mode, reports will be generated by
                             days in a separate directory, --outdir must be set.
    -j | --jobs number     : number of jobs to run at same time. Run as single
                             by default or when working with csvlog.
    -J | --Jobs number     : number of log file to parse in parallel. Process one
                             file at a time by default or when csvlog is used.
    -l | --last-parsed file: allow incremental log parsing by registering the
                             last datetime and line parsed. Useful if you want
                             to watch errors since last run or if you want one
                             report per day with a log rotated each week.
    -L | --logfile-list file:file containing a list of log file to parse.
    -m | --maxlength size  : maximum length of a query, it will be restricted to
                             the given size. Default truncate size is 100000.
    -M | --no-multiline    : do not collect multiline statement to avoid garbage
                             especially on errors that generate a huge report.
    -n | --nohighlight     : disable SQL code highlighting.
    -N | --appname name    : only report on entries for given application name
    -o | --outfile filename: define the filename for the output. Default depends
                             on the output format: out.html, out.txt, out.bin,
                             out.json or out.tsung. This option can be used
                             multiple time to output several format. To use json
                             output the Perl module JSON::XS must be installed,
                             To dump output to stdout use - as filename.
    -O | --outdir path     : directory where out file must be saved.
    -p | --prefix string   : the value of your custom log_line_prefix as
                             defined in your postgresql.conf. Only use it if you
                             aren't using one of the standard prefixes specified
                             in the pgBadger documentation, such as if your
                             prefix includes additional variables like client ip
                             or application name. See examples below.
    -P | --no-prettify     : disable SQL queries prettify formatter.
    -q | --quiet           : don't print anything to stdout, not even a progress
                             bar.
    -Q | --query-numbering : add numbering of queries to the output when using
                             options --dump-all-queries or --normalized-only.
    -r | --remote-host ip  : set the host where to execute the cat command on
                             remote logfile to parse locally the file.
    -R | --retention N     : number of weeks to keep in incremental mode. Default
                             to 0, disabled. Used to set the number of weeks to
                             keep in output directory. Older weeks and days
                             directory are automatically removed.
    -s | --sample number   : number of query samples to store. Default: 3.
    -S | --select-only     : only report SELECT queries.
    -t | --top number      : number of queries to store/display. Default: 20.
    -T | --title string    : change title of the HTML page report.
    -u | --dbuser username : only report on entries for the given user.
    -U | --exclude-user username : exclude entries for the specified user from
                             report. Can be used multiple time.
    -v | --verbose         : enable verbose or debug mode. Disabled by default.
    -V | --version         : show pgBadger version and exit.
    -w | --watch-mode      : only report errors just like logwatch could do.
    -W | --wide-char       : encode html output of queries into UTF8 to avoid
                             Perl message "Wide character in print".
    -x | --extension       : output format. Values: text, html, bin, json or
                             tsung. Default: html
    -X | --extra-files     : in incremental mode allow pgBadger to write CSS and
                             JS files in the output directory as separate files.
    -z | --zcat exec_path  : set the full path to the zcat program. Use it if
                             zcat or bzcat or unzip is not in your path.
    -Z | --timezone +/-XX  : Set the number of hours from GMT of the timezone.
                             Use this to adjust date/time in JavaScript graphs.
    --pie-limit num        : pie data lower than num% will show a sum instead.
    --exclude-query regex  : any query matching the given regex will be excluded
                             from the report. For example: "^(VACUUM|COMMIT)"
                             You can use this option multiple times.
    --exclude-file filename: path of the file which contains all the regex to
                             use to exclude queries from the report. One regex
                             per line.
    --include-query regex  : any query that does not match the given regex will
                             be excluded from the report. You can use this
                             option multiple times. For example: "(tbl1|tbl2)".
    --include-file filename: path of the file which contains all the regex of
                             the queries to include from the report. One regex
                             per line.
    --disable-error        : do not generate error report.
    --disable-hourly       : do not generate hourly report.
    --disable-type         : do not generate report of queries by type, database
                             or user.
    --disable-query        : do not generate query reports (slowest, most
                             frequent, queries by users, by database, ...).
    --disable-session      : do not generate session report.
    --disable-connection   : do not generate connection report.
    --disable-lock         : do not generate lock report.
    --disable-temporary    : do not generate temporary report.
    --disable-checkpoint   : do not generate checkpoint/restartpoint report.
    --disable-autovacuum   : do not generate autovacuum report.
    --charset              : used to set the HTML charset to be used.
                             Default: utf-8.
    --csv-separator        : used to set the CSV field separator, default: ,
    --exclude-time  regex  : any timestamp matching the given regex will be
                             excluded from the report. Example: "2013-04-12 .*"
                             You can use this option multiple times.
    --include-time  regex  : only timestamps matching the given regex will be
                             included in the report. Example: "2013-04-12 .*"
                             You can use this option multiple times.
    --exclude-db name      : exclude entries for the specified database from
                             report. Example: "pg_dump". Can be used multiple
                             time.
    --exclude-appname name : exclude entries for the specified application name
                             from report.  Example: "pg_dump".  Can be used
                             multiple time.
    --exclude-line regex   : pgBadger will start to exclude any log entry that
                             will match the given regex. Can be used multiple
                             time.
    --exclude-client name  : exclude log entries for the specified client ip.
                             Can be used multiple time.
    --anonymize            : obscure all literals in queries, useful to hide
                             confidential data.
    --noreport             : prevent pgBadger to create reports in incremental
                             mode.
    --log-duration         : force pgBadger to associate log entries generated
                             by both log_duration = on and log_statement = 'all'
    --enable-checksum      : used to add a md5 sum under each query report.
    --journalctl command   : command to use to replace PostgreSQL logfile by
                             a call to journalctl. Basically it might be:
                                journalctl -u postgresql-9.5
    --pid-dir path         : set the path where the pid file must be stored.
                             Default /tmp
    --pid-file file        : set the name of the pid file to manage concurrent
                             execution of pgBadger. Default: pgbadger.pid
    --rebuild              : used to rebuild all html reports in incremental
                             output directories where there's binary data files.
    --pgbouncer-only       : only show PgBouncer related menu in the header.
    --start-monday         : in incremental mode, calendar's weeks start on
                             a sunday. Use this option to start on a monday.
    --iso-week-number      : in incremental mode, calendar's weeks start on a
                             monday and respect the ISO 8601 week number, range
                             01 to 53, where week 1 is the first week that has
                             at least 4 days in the new year.
    --normalized-only      : only dump all normalized query to out.txt
    --log-timezone +/-XX   : Set the number of hours from GMT of the timezone
                             that must be used to adjust date/time read from
                             log file before beeing parsed. Using this option
                             make more difficult log search with a date/time.
    --prettify-json        : use it if you want json output to be prettified.
    --month-report YYYY-MM : create a cumulative HTML report over the specified
                             month. Requires incremental output directories and
                             the presence of all necessary binary data files
    --noexplain            : do not process lines generated by auto_explain.
    --command CMD          : command to execute to retrieve log entries on
                             stdin. pgBadger will open a pipe to the command
                             and parse log entries generated by the command.
    --no-week              : inform pgbadger to not build weekly reports in
                             incremental mode. Useful if it takes too much time.
    --explain-url URL      : use it to override the url of the graphical explain
                             tool. Default: http://explain.depesz.com/?is_public=0&is_anon=0&plan=
    --tempdir DIR          : set directory where temporary files will be written
                             Default: File::Spec->tmpdir() || '/tmp'
    --no-process-info      : disable changing process title to help identify
                             pgbadger process, some system do not support it.
    --dump-all-queries     : dump all queries found in the log file replacing
                             bind parameters are included in the queries at
                             their respective placeholders position.
    --keep-comments        : do not remove comments from normalized queries. It
                             can be useful if you want to distinguish between
                             same normalized queries.

pgBadger is able to parse a remote log file using a passwordless ssh connection.
Use the -r or --remote-host to set the host ip address or hostname. There's also
some additional options to fully control the ssh connection.

    --ssh-program ssh        path to the ssh program to use. Default: ssh.
    --ssh-port port          ssh port to use for the connection. Default: 22.
    --ssh-user username      connection login name. Default to running user.
    --ssh-identity file      path to the identity file to use.
    --ssh-timeout second     timeout to ssh connection failure. Default 10 secs.
    --ssh-option  options    list of -o options to use for the ssh connection.
                             Options always used:
                                 -o ConnectTimeout=$ssh_timeout
                                 -o PreferredAuthentications=hostbased,publickey

Log file to parse can also be specified using an URI, supported protocol are
http\[s\] and \[s\]ftp. The curl command will be used to download the file and the
file will be parsed during download. The ssh protocol is also supported and will
use the ssh command like with the remote host use. See examples bellow.

Examples:

    pgbadger /var/log/postgresql.log
    pgbadger /var/log/postgres.log.2.gz /var/log/postgres.log.1.gz /var/log/postgres.log
    pgbadger /var/log/postgresql/postgresql-2012-05-*
    pgbadger --exclude-query="^(COPY|COMMIT)" /var/log/postgresql.log
    pgbadger -b "2012-06-25 10:56:11" -e "2012-06-25 10:59:11" /var/log/postgresql.log
    cat /var/log/postgres.log | pgbadger -
    # Log prefix with stderr log output
    pgbadger --prefix '%t [%p]: user=%u,db=%d,client=%h' /pglog/postgresql-2012-08-21*
    pgbadger --prefix '%m %u@%d %p %r %a : ' /pglog/postgresql.log
    # Log line prefix with syslog log output
    pgbadger --prefix 'user=%u,db=%d,client=%h,appname=%a' /pglog/postgresql-2012-08-21*
    # Use my 8 CPUs to parse my 10GB file faster, much faster
    pgbadger -j 8 /pglog/postgresql-10.1-main.log

Use URI notation for remote log file:

    pgbadger http://172.12.110.1//var/log/postgresql/postgresql-10.1-main.log
    pgbadger ftp://username@172.12.110.14/postgresql-10.1-main.log
    pgbadger ssh://username@172.12.110.14:2222//var/log/postgresql/postgresql-10.1-main.log*

You can use together a local PostgreSQL log and a remote pgbouncer log file to parse:

    pgbadger /var/log/postgresql/postgresql-10.1-main.log ssh://username@172.12.110.14/pgbouncer.log

Generate Tsung sessions XML file with select queries only:

    pgbadger -S -o sessions.tsung --prefix '%t [%p]: user=%u,db=%d ' /pglog/postgresql-10.1.log

Reporting errors every week by cron job:

    30 23 * * 1 /usr/bin/pgbadger -q -w /var/log/postgresql.log -o /var/reports/pg_errors.html

Generate report every week using incremental behavior:

    0 4 * * 1 /usr/bin/pgbadger -q `find /var/log/ -mtime -7 -name "postgresql.log*"` -o /var/reports/pg_errors-`date +\%F`.html -l /var/reports/pgbadger_incremental_file.dat

This supposes that your log file and HTML report are also rotated every week.

Or better, use the auto-generated incremental reports:

    0 4 * * * /usr/bin/pgbadger -I -q /var/log/postgresql/postgresql.log.1 -O /var/www/pg_reports/

will generate a report per day and per week.

In incremental mode, you can also specify the number of week to keep in the
reports:

    /usr/bin/pgbadger --retention 2 -I -q /var/log/postgresql/postgresql.log.1 -O /var/www/pg_reports/

If you have a pg\_dump at 23:00 and 13:00 each day during half an hour, you can
use pgBadger as follow to exclude these period from the report:

    pgbadger --exclude-time "2013-09-.* (23|13):.*" postgresql.log

This will help avoid having COPY statements, as generated by pg\_dump, on top of
the list of slowest queries. You can also use --exclude-appname "pg\_dump" to
solve this problem in a simpler way.

You can also parse journalctl output just as if it was a log file:

    pgbadger --journalctl 'journalctl -u postgresql-9.5'

or worst, call it from a remote host:

    pgbadger -r 192.168.1.159 --journalctl 'journalctl -u postgresql-9.5'

you don't need to specify any log file at command line, but if you have other
PostgreSQL log file to parse, you can add them as usual.

To rebuild all incremental html reports after, proceed as follow:

    rm /path/to/reports/*.js
    rm /path/to/reports/*.css
    pgbadger -X -I -O /path/to/reports/ --rebuild

it will also update all resource files (JS and CSS). Use -E or --explode
if the reports were built using this option.

pgBadger also support Heroku PostgreSQL logs using logplex format:

    heroku logs -p postgres | pgbadger -f logplex -o heroku.html -

this will stream Heroku PostgreSQL log to pgbadger through stdin.

pgBadger can auto detect RDS and cloudwatch PostgreSQL logs using
rds format:

    pgbadger -f rds -o rds_out.html rds.log

CloudSQL Postgresql logs it's fairly normal PostgreSQL log but encapsulated in
JSON format. It is auto detected too by pgBagder but in case you need to force
the log format, use \`jsonlog\`

    pgbadger -f jsonlog -o cloudsql_out.html cloudsql.log

This is the same than with the jsonlog extension, the json format is different
but pgBadger can parse both format.

To create a cumulative report over a month use command:

    pgbadger --month-report 2919-05 /path/to/incremantal/reports/

this will add a link to the month name into the calendar view in
incremental reports to look at report for month 2019 May.
Use -E or --explode if the reports were built using this option.

### DESCRIPTION

pgBadger is a PostgreSQL log analyzer built for speed providing fully
detailed reports based on your PostgreSQL log files. It's a small standalone
Perl script that outperforms any other PostgreSQL log analyzer.

It is written in pure Perl and uses a JavaScript library (flotr2) to draw
graphs so that you don't need to install any additional Perl modules or
other packages. Furthermore, this library gives us more features such
as zooming. pgBadger also uses the Bootstrap JavaScript library and
the FontAwesome webfont for better design. Everything is embedded.

pgBadger is able to autodetect your log file format (syslog, stderr, csvlog
or jsonlog) if the file is long enough. It is designed to parse huge log
files as well as compressed files. Supported compressed format are gzip,
bzip2, lz4, xz, zip and zstd. For the xz format you must have an xz version
upper than 5.05 that supports the --robot option. In order pgbadger determine
uncompressed file size with lz4, file must be compressed with --content-size
option. For the complete list of features see below.

All charts are zoomable and can be saved as PNG images.

You can also limit pgBadger to only report errors or remove any part of the
report using command line options.

pgBadger supports any custom format set into the log\_line\_prefix directive of
your postgresql.conf file as long as it at least specify the %t and %p patterns.

pgBadger allows parallel processing of a single log file or multiple
files through the use of the -j option specifying the number of CPUs.

If you want to save system performance you can also use log\_duration instead of
log\_min\_duration\_statement to have reports on duration and number of queries only.

### FEATURE

pgBadger reports everything about your SQL queries:

        Overall statistics.
        The most frequent waiting queries.
        Queries that waited the most.
        Queries generating the most temporary files.
        Queries generating the largest temporary files.
        The slowest queries.
        Queries that took up the most time.
        The most frequent queries.
        The most frequent errors.
        Histogram of query times.
        Histogram of sessions times.
        Users involved in top queries.
        Applications involved in top queries.
        Queries generating the most cancellation.
        Queries most cancelled.
        The most time consuming prepare/bind queries

The following reports are also available with hourly charts divided into
periods of five minutes:

        SQL queries statistics.
        Temporary file statistics.
        Checkpoints statistics.
        Autovacuum and autoanalyze statistics.
        Cancelled queries.
        Error events (panic, fatal, error and warning).
        Error class distribution.

There are also some pie charts about distribution of:

        Locks statistics.
        Queries by type (select/insert/update/delete).
        Distribution of queries type per database/application
        Sessions per database/user/client/application.
        Connections per database/user/client/application.
        Autovacuum and autoanalyze per table.
        Queries per user and total duration per user.

All charts are zoomable and can be saved as PNG images. SQL queries reported are
highlighted and beautified automatically.

pgBadger is also able to parse PgBouncer log files and to create the following
reports:

        Request Throughput
        Bytes I/O Throughput
        Queries Average duration
        Simultaneous sessions
        Histogram of sessions times
        Sessions per database
        Sessions per user
        Sessions per host
        Established connections
        Connections per database
        Connections per user
        Connections per host
        Most used reserved pools
        Most Frequent Errors/Events

You can also have incremental reports with one report per day and a cumulative
report per week. Two multiprocess modes are available to speed up log parsing,
one using one core per log file, and the second using multiple cores to parse
a single file. These modes can be combined.

Histogram granularity can be adjusted using the -A command line option. By default
they will report the mean of each top queries/errors occurring per hour, but you can
specify the granularity down to the minute.

pgBadger can also be used in a central place to parse remote log files using a
passwordless SSH connection. This mode can be used with compressed files and in
the multiprocess per file mode (-J) but can not be used with the CSV log format.

### REQUIREMENT

pgBadger comes as a single Perl script - you do not need anything other than a modern
Perl distribution. Charts are rendered using a JavaScript library so you don't need
anything other than a web browser. Your browser will do all the work.

If you planned to parse PostgreSQL CSV log files you might need some Perl Modules:

        Text::CSV_XS - to parse PostgreSQL CSV log files.

This module is optional, if you don't have PostgreSQL log in the CSV format you don't
need to install it.

If you want to export statistics as JSON file you need an additional Perl module:

        JSON::XS - JSON serialising/deserialising, done correctly and fast

This module is optional, if you don't select the json output format you don't
need to install it. You can install it on a Debian like system using:

        sudo apt-get install libjson-xs-perl

and in RPM like system using:

        sudo yum install perl-JSON-XS

Compressed log file format is autodetected from the file extension. If pgBadger find
a gz extension it will use the zcat utility, with a bz2 extension it will use bzcat,
with lz4 it will use lz4cat, with zst it will use zstdcat and if the file extension
is zip or xz then the unzip or xz utilities will be used.

If those utilities are not found in the PATH environment variable then use the --zcat
command line option to change this path. For example:

        --zcat="/usr/local/bin/gunzip -c" or --zcat="/usr/local/bin/bzip2 -dc"
        --zcat="C:\tools\unzip -p"

By default pgBadger will use the zcat, bzcat, lz4cat, zstdcat and unzip utilities
following the file extension. If you use the default autodetection compress format
you can mixed gz, bz2, lz4, xz, zip or zstd files. Specifying a custom value to
\--zcat option will remove this feature of mixed compressed format.

Note that multiprocessing can not be used with compressed files or CSV files as
well as under Windows platform.

### INSTALLATION

Download the tarball from GitHub and unpack the archive as follow:

        tar xzf pgbadger-11.x.tar.gz
        cd pgbadger-11.x/
        perl Makefile.PL
        make && sudo make install

This will copy the Perl script pgbadger to /usr/local/bin/pgbadger by default and the
man page into /usr/local/share/man/man1/pgbadger.1. Those are the default installation
directories for 'site' install.

If you want to install all under /usr/ location, use INSTALLDIRS='perl' as an argument
of Makefile.PL. The script will be installed into /usr/bin/pgbadger and the manpage
into /usr/share/man/man1/pgbadger.1.

For example, to install everything just like Debian does, proceed as follows:

        perl Makefile.PL INSTALLDIRS=vendor

By default INSTALLDIRS is set to site.

### POSTGRESQL CONFIGURATION

You must enable and set some configuration directives in your postgresql.conf
before starting.

You must first enable SQL query logging to have something to parse:

        log_min_duration_statement = 0

Here every statement will be logged, on a busy server you may want to increase
this value to only log queries with a longer duration. Note that if you have
log\_statement set to 'all' nothing will be logged through the log\_min\_duration\_statement
directive. See the next chapter for more information.

pgBadger supports any custom format set into the log\_line\_prefix directive of
your postgresql.conf file as long as it at least specify a time escape sequence
(%t, %m or %n) and the process related escape sequence (%p or %c).

For example, with 'stderr' log format, log\_line\_prefix must be at least:

        log_line_prefix = '%t [%p]: '

Log line prefix could add user, database name, application name and client ip
address as follows:

        log_line_prefix = '%t [%p]: user=%u,db=%d,app=%a,client=%h '

or for syslog log file format:

        log_line_prefix = 'user=%u,db=%d,app=%a,client=%h '

Log line prefix for stderr output could also be:

        log_line_prefix = '%t [%p]: db=%d,user=%u,app=%a,client=%h '

or for syslog output:

        log_line_prefix = 'db=%d,user=%u,app=%a,client=%h '

You need to enable other parameters in postgresql.conf to get more information from your log files:

        log_checkpoints = on
        log_connections = on
        log_disconnections = on
        log_lock_waits = on
        log_temp_files = 0
        log_autovacuum_min_duration = 0
        log_error_verbosity = default

Do not enable log\_statement as its log format will not be parsed by pgBadger.

Of course your log messages should be in English with or without locale support:

        lc_messages='en_US.UTF-8'
        lc_messages='C'

pgBadger parser do not support other locale like 'fr\_FR.UTF-8' for example.

### LOG STATEMENTS

Considerations about log\_min\_duration\_statement, log\_duration and log\_statement
configuration directives.

If you want the query statistics to include the actual query strings, you
must set log\_min\_duration\_statement to 0 or more milliseconds.

If you just want to report duration and number of queries and don't want all
details about queries, set log\_min\_duration\_statement to -1 to disable it and
enable log\_duration in your postgresql.conf file. If you want to add the most
common request report you can either choose to set log\_min\_duration\_statement
to a higher value or choose to enable log\_statement.

Enabling log\_min\_duration\_statement will add reports about slowest queries and
queries that took up the most time. Take care that if you have log\_statement
set to 'all' nothing will be logged with log\_min\_duration\_statement.

Warning: Do not enable both log\_min\_duration\_statement, log\_duration and
log\_statement all together, this will result in wrong counter values. Note
that this will also increase drastically the size of your log.
log\_min\_duration\_statement should always be preferred.

### PARALLEL PROCESSING

To enable parallel processing you just have to use the -j N option where N is
the number of cores you want to use.

pgBadger will then proceed as follow:

        for each log file
            chunk size = int(file size / N)
            look at start/end offsets of these chunks
            fork N processes and seek to the start offset of each chunk
                each process will terminate when the parser reach the end offset
                of its chunk
                each process write stats into a binary temporary file
            wait for all children processes to terminate
        All binary temporary files generated will then be read and loaded into
        memory to build the html output.

With that method, at start/end of chunks pgBadger may truncate or omit a
maximum of N queries per log file which is an insignificant gap if you have
millions of queries in your log file. The chance that the query that you were
looking for is lost is near 0, this is why I think this gap is livable. Most
of the time the query is counted twice but truncated.

When you have many small log files and many CPUs it is speedier to dedicate
one core to one log file at a time. To enable this behavior you have to use
option -J N instead. With 200 log files of 10MB each the use of the -J option
starts being really interesting with 8 Cores. Using this method you will be
sure not to lose any queries in the reports.

Here is a benchmark done on a server with 8 CPUs and a single file of 9.5GB.

         Option |  1 CPU  | 2 CPU | 4 CPU | 8 CPU
        --------+---------+-------+-------+------
           -j   | 1h41m18 | 50m25 | 25m39 | 15m58
           -J   | 1h41m18 | 54m28 | 41m16 | 34m45

With 200 log files of 10MB each, so 2GB in total, the results are slightly
different:

         Option | 1 CPU | 2 CPU | 4 CPU | 8 CPU
        --------+-------+-------+-------+------
           -j   | 20m15 |  9m56 |  5m20 | 4m20
           -J   | 20m15 |  9m49 |  5m00 | 2m40

So it is recommended to use -j unless you have hundreds of small log files
and can use at least 8 CPUs.

IMPORTANT: when you are using parallel parsing pgBadger will generate a
lot of temporary files in the /tmp directory and will remove them at the
end, so do not remove those files unless pgBadger is not running. They are
all named with the following template tmp\_pgbadgerXXXX.bin so they can be
easily identified.

### INCREMENTAL REPORTS

pgBadger includes an automatic incremental report mode using option -I or
\--incremental. When running in this mode, pgBadger will generate one report
per day and a cumulative report per week. Output is first done in binary
format into the mandatory output directory (see option -O or --outdir),
then in HTML format for daily and weekly reports with a main index file.

The main index file will show a dropdown menu per week with a link to each
week report and links to daily reports of each week.

For example, if you run pgBadger as follows based on a daily rotated file:

    0 4 * * * /usr/bin/pgbadger -I -q /var/log/postgresql/postgresql.log.1 -O /var/www/pg_reports/

you will have all daily and weekly reports for the full running period.

In this mode pgBadger will create an automatic incremental file in the
output directory, so you don't have to use the -l option unless you want
to change the path of that file. This means that you can run pgBadger in
this mode each day on a log file rotated each week, and it will not count
the log entries twice.

To save disk space you may want to use the -X or --extra-files command line
option to force pgBadger to write JavaScript and CSS to separate files in
the output directory. The resources will then be loaded using script and
link tags.

#### Rebuilding reports

Incremental reports can be rebuilt after a pgbadger report fix or a new
feature to update all HTML reports. To rebuild all reports where a binary
file is still present proceed as follow:

    rm /path/to/reports/*.js
    rm /path/to/reports/*.css
    pgbadger -X -I -O /path/to/reports/ --rebuild

it will also update all resource files (JS and CSS). Use -E or --explode
if the reports were built using this option.

#### Monthly reports

By default pgBadger in incremental mode only computes daily and weekly reports.
If you want monthly cumulative reports you will have to use a separate command
to specify the report to build. For example to build a report for August 2019:

    pgbadger -X --month-report 2919-08 /var/www/pg_reports/

this will add a link to the month name into the calendar view of incremental
reports to look at monthly report. The report for a current month can be run
every day it is entirely rebuilt each time. The monthly report is not built by
default because it could take lot of time following the amount of data.

If reports were built with the per database option ( -E | --explode ) it must
be used too when calling pgbadger to build monthly report:

    pgbadger -E -X --month-report 2919-08 /var/www/pg_reports/

This is the same when using the rebuild option ( -R | --rebuild ).

### BINARY FORMAT

Using the binary format it is possible to create custom incremental and
cumulative reports. For example, if you want to refresh a pgBadger
report each hour from a daily PostgreSQL log file, you can proceed by
running each hour the following commands:

    pgbadger --last-parsed .pgbadger_last_state_file -o sunday/hourX.bin /var/log/pgsql/postgresql-Sun.log

to generate the incremental data files in binary format. And to generate the fresh HTML
report from that binary file:

    pgbadger sunday/*.bin

Or as another example, if you generate one log file per hour and you want
reports to be rebuilt each time the log file is rotated, proceed as
follows:

        pgbadger -o day1/hour01.bin /var/log/pgsql/pglog/postgresql-2012-03-23_10.log
        pgbadger -o day1/hour02.bin /var/log/pgsql/pglog/postgresql-2012-03-23_11.log
        pgbadger -o day1/hour03.bin /var/log/pgsql/pglog/postgresql-2012-03-23_12.log
        ...

When you want to refresh the HTML report, for example each time after a new binary file
is generated, just do the following:

        pgbadger -o day1_report.html day1/*.bin

Adjust the commands to suit your particular needs.

### JSON FORMAT

JSON format is good for sharing data with other languages, which makes it
easy to integrate pgBadger result into other monitoring tools like Cacti
or Graphite.

### AUTHORS

pgBadger is an original work from Gilles Darold.

The pgBadger logo is an original creation of Damien Cazeils.

The pgBadger v4.x design comes from the "Art is code" company.

This web site is a work of Gilles Darold.

pgBadger is maintained by Gilles Darold and every one who wants to contribute.

Many people have contributed to pgBadger, they are all quoted in the Changelog file.

### LICENSE

pgBadger is free software distributed under the PostgreSQL Licence.

Copyright (c) 2012-2020, Gilles Darold

A modified version of the SQL::Beautify Perl Module is embedded in pgBadger
with copyright (C) 2009 by Jonas Kramer and is published under the terms of
the Artistic License 2.0.