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<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0//EN">
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   <TITLE> Summary of current NEOCP objects </TITLE>
   <META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
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<h2> Summary of current NEOCP objects </h2>

<p><i> Last regenerated %TIME% UTC </i> </p>

<p> This is automatically regenerated at hourly intervals to include
updates from the
<a href="http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/NEO/toconfirm_tabular.html">
NEOCP (Near-Earth Object Confirmation Page)</a>.  Click on the
designation for any object to get a pseudo-MPEC for it.  Uncertainties
in orbital elements will almost always be given. </p>

<p> <b> To be done: </b> Provide advice on which object(s) are most in need
of follow-up.  This will take into account factors such as:  is the
uncertainty more than a few arcseconds,  but low enough to make it possible
to find the object?  Is the uncertainty within reason,  but about to grow
to a point where the object will be hard to find?   Is the object about to
get really faint? Is a close approach/impact imminent? Does it have
weird/interesting orbital elements?  Is this a possible radar or ARRM
target? </p>

<p> Also,  source code for all this needs to be posted,  and (I hope)
this system run on other servers as a backup plan. </p>

<p> <b> Note: </b> 'Sig1' = current ephemeris uncertainty;  'Sig2' =
ephemeris uncertainty in two days. <b> This is a good guide as to
how important it is to get a particular object. </b> If the current
uncertainty is ten arcseconds,  but it'll be twenty degrees in two days,
you'd best get it soon.  If it'll only have grown to an arcminute,  it
may not be so important.  (Though it's only a guide.  The object may get
faint or close to the sun or too far south or north for you during those
two days.  Which is why my work here is not yet done.) </p>

<p> <a href="#desig"> Click here for a list sorted by designation </a> <br>
    <a href="#unc"> Click here for a list sorted by ephemeris uncertainty </a> <br>
    <a href="#moid"> Click here for a list sorted by Earth MOID </a> <br>
    <a href="#mag"> Click here for a list sorted by magnitude </a> <br> </p>

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