File: TODO

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Positron TODO List

Bugs
----

* A file can be added to the database twice if the file is removed
  from disk but not the database, then it is added again.

* Ctrl-C during some operations will result in a corrupted database.


Features
--------

* HiSi identification support

* Playlist management

* Making firmware updates


USB Issues
----------

(Note that it is not clear where the best place for the solution of
these problems is (the firmware vs. the operating system), but they
are definitely not solvable in positron.)

* The Mandrake 9.0 kernel (2.4.19-16mdk) is very buggy with the
Neuros.  Frequently, the Neuros is never assigned a SCSI device, or is
never even recognized by the USB subsystem, and the usb modules are
locked up.  Removing them is impossible, and the system needs to be
rebooted.  ==> Solution: Use Mandrake 9.1.  No observed problems.

* The Neuros does not responding to the "Mode Sense" command defined 
in the USB Mass Storage Class standard.

When the host computer sends a Mode Sense command to the Neuros, the
request is ignored, or fails in some other way.  I see direct evidence
of this in the USB debugging messages in Linux.

Different operating systems appear to deal with this failure in
different ways.  Linux (and I presume Windows) just assumes the device
is read-write.  Darwin (and therefore OS X) assumes the device is
read-only.  The result is that it is impossible to update the database
on OS X because the Neuros cannot be written to.  Because Linux and
Windows assume the device is read-write, there is no problem there.

The only OS this will cause a problem for is Mac OS X.  Unfortunately,
the workaround requires a trivial patch to the USB Mass Storage
component of Darwin, which I doubt many OS X users would be willing to
install.  (It might be possible to deliver the update through a friendly
installer, but I don't know about all the issues and pitfalls with
updating core OS components in OS X.)

* Unmounting on OS X causes the Finder to go into an infinite loop.

My best guess, (again, watching USB debug messages in Linux) is this
is because the Neuros also does not respond to a USB Mass Storage
command, which Linux can deal with, but OS X chokes on.