File: CHANGES.txt

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Change history for demjson python module.

Version 2.2.4 released 2015-12-22
=================================

* Fix problem with jsonlint under Python 3 when trying to reformat
  JSON (-f or -F options) and writing the output to standard output.


Version 2.2.3 released 2014-11-12
=================================

* Fix return value of "jsonlint" command.  It should return a
  non-zero value when an error is reported.
  GitHub Issue 12: https://github.com/dmeranda/demjson/issues/12

* Fix unit test failure in 32-bit Python 2.x environment.  This bug
  only affected the unit tests, and was not a problem in the code
  demjson module.
  GitHub Issue 13: https://github.com/dmeranda/demjson/issues/13


Version 2.2.2 released 2014-06-25
=================================
This minor release only fixes installation issues in older Python 3
environments (< 3.4).

If you are using Python 2 or Python 3.4, then there is nothing new.
Once installed, there were no other changes to the API or any aspect
of demjson operation.

* Workarounds for bugs in Python's '2to3' conversion tool in Python
  versions prior to 3.3.3.  This was Python bug 18037:
  <http://bugs.python.org/issue18037>

* The setup.py will install correctly in Python 3 environments that do
  not have the 'setuptools' module installed.  It can now make use of
  the more limited 'distutils' module instead.

* The unit tests will now work without generating DeprecationWarning
  messages under certain Python 3 versions.



Version 2.2.1 released 2014-06-24
=================================
Minor changes.

* HTML use: A new encoding option, 'html_safe', is available when
  encoding to JSON to force any characters which are not considered to
  be HTML-safe (or XML-safe) to be encoded.  This includes '<', '>',
  '&', and '/' -- among other characters which are always escaped
  regardless of this new option.  This is useful when applications
  attempt to embed JSON into HTML and are not prepared to do the
  proper escaping.  For jsonlint use '--html-safe'.

      $ echo '"h&quot;ello</script>world]]>" | jsonlint -f --html-safe
      "h\u0026quot;ello\u003c\/script\u003eworld]]\u003e"

  See also CVE-2009-4924 for a similar report in another JSON package
  for needing a way to do HTML-safe escaping.
  <http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2009-4924>

* Bug fix: If you created an instance of the 'json_options' class to
  store any options, and then attempted to make a copy with it's
  copy() method, not all of the options stored within it were copied.
  This bug is very unlikely to occur, but it was fixed regardless.

* Tests: The included self-test scripts for demjson should now pass
  all tests when running under a narrow-Unicode version of Python.

  It should be noted that the statistics for strings (max length, max
  codepoint, etc.)  may not be correct under a narrow-Unicode Python.
  This is a known issue that is likely not to be fixed.


Version 2.2 released 2014-06-20
=================================
    [Note, version 2.1 was never released.]

This release fixes compatibility with Python 2.6 and any Python
compiled with narrow-Unicode; fixes bugs with statistics; adds new
file I/O convenience functions; as well as adding many new
enhancements concerning the treatment of numbers and floating-point
values.

* Python 2.6 support is now fixed (tested with 2.6.9).

* Narrow-Unicode: demjson now works correctly when used with a Python
  that was compiled with narrow-Unicode (BMP only) support; i.e., when
  sys.maxunicode == 0xFFFF.

  Note that narrow-Pythons simulate non-BMP characters as a UTF-16
  surrogate-pair encoding; so string lengths, ord(), and other such
  operations on Python strings may be surprising:

      len( u"\U00010030" )    # => 1 for wide-Pythons
      len( u"\U00010030" )    # => 2 for narrow-Pythons

  With this release you may encode and decode any Unicode character,
  including non-BMP characters, with demjson just as if Python was
  compiled for wide-Unicode.

* Statistics bug: In certain cases some of the decoding statistics
  results -- obtained by passing 'return_stats=True' to the decode()
  function -- were not getting set with the correct count. For example
  the 'num_bools' item may not have reflected the total number of
  'true' or 'false' identifiers appearing in the JSON document.  This
  has now been fixed, and more thorough test cases added to the test
  suite.

* Negative NaN bug: Fixed a bug when decoding the JavaScript literal
  "-NaN" (a negative NaN) that caused a decoding error.  Now it
  correctly produces a Python equivalent NaN (not-a-number) value.
  Since the sign of a NaN is insignificant, encountering a "-NaN"
  which would have triggered the bug was quite unlikely.

* decode_file: A convenience function 'decode_file()' has been added
  which wraps the 'decode()' function and which reads the JSON
  document from a file.  It will correctly open the file in binary
  mode and insure the file is closed.  All other options supported
  by decode() can be passed.

      data = decode_file( "sample.json", allow_comments=True )

* encode_to_file: A convenience function 'encode_to_file()' has been
  added which wraps the 'encode()' function and which writes the
  resultant JSON document into a file.  It will correctly open the
  file in binary mode and insure it is properly closed.

  By default encode the JSON will be encoded as UTF-8 unless otherwise
  specified with the 'encoding' option. All other options supported by
  encode() can be passed.

  This function will also refuse to overwrite any existing file
  unless the 'overwrite' option is set to True.

      encode_to_file( "sample.json", data, overwrite=True )

* Number radix: When reformatting with jsonlint, in non-strict mode,
  the original radix of numbers will be preserved (controlled with the
  '--[no]-keep-format' option).  If a number in a JSON/JavaScript text
  was hex (0x1C), octal (0o177, 0177), or binary (0b1011); then it
  will stay in that format rather than being converted to decimal.

      $ echo '[10, 0xA, 012, 0b1010]' | jsonlint -f --nonstrict
      [
        10,
        0xa,
        012,
        0b1010
      ]

  Correspondinly, in the decode() function there is a new option
  'keep_format' that when True will return non-decimal integer values
  as a type 'json_int'; which is a subclass of the standard int, but
  that additionally remembers the original radix format (hex,etc.).

* Integer as Float: There is a new option, int_as_float, that allows
  you to decode all numbers as floating point rather than
  distinguishing integers from floats.  This allows you to parse JSON
  exactly as JavaScript would do, as it lacks an integer type.

      demjson.decode( '123', int_as_float=True )   # =>  123.0

* Float vs Decimal: You can now control the promotion of 'float' to
  'decimal.Decimal' numbers. Normally demjson will try to keep
  floating-point numbers as the Python 'float' type, unless there is
  an overflow or loss of precision, in which case it will use
  'decimal.Decimal' instead.  The new option 'float_type' can control
  this type selection:

      float_type = demjson.NUMBER_AUTO     # The default
      float_type = demjson.NUMBER_DECIMAL  # Always use decimal
      float_type = demjson.NUMBER_FLOAT    # Always use float

  Do note that if using NUMBER_FLOAT -- which disables the promotion
  to the decimal.Decimal type -- that besides possible loss of
  precision (significant digits) that numeric underflow or overflow
  can also occur.  So very large numbers may result in 'inf'
  (infinity) and small numbers either in subnormal values or even just
  zero.

  Normally when demjson encounters the JavaScript keywords 'NaN',
  'Infinity', and '-Infinity' it will decode them as the Python float
  equivalent (demjson.nan, demjson.inf, and demjson.neginf).  However
  if you use NUMBER_DECIMAL then these will be converted to decimal
  equivalents instead: Decimal('NaN'), Decimal('Infinity'), and
  Decimal('-Infinity').

* Significant digits: When reformatting JSON, the jsonlint command
  will now try to preserve all significant digits present in
  floating-point numbers when possible.

     $ echo "3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286" | \
       jsonlint -f --quiet

     3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286

* Decimal contexts: The Python 'decimal' module allows the user
  to establish different "contexts", which among other things can
  change the number of significant digits kept, the maximum exponent
  value, and so on.  If the default context is not sufficient (which
  allows 23 significant digits), you can tell demjson to use a
  different context by setting the option 'decimal_context'.  It
  may take several values:

      'default'   -- Use Python's default:  decimal.DefaultContext
      'basic'     -- Use Python's basic:    decimal.BasicContext
      'extended'  -- Use Python's extended: decimal.ExtendedContext
      123         -- Creates a context with the number of significant digits.
      <context>   -- Any instance of the class decimal.Context.

  This option is only available in the programming interface and is not
  directly exposed by the jsonlint command.

      import decimal, demjson

      myctx = decimal.Context( prec=50, rounding=decimal.ROUND_DOWN )
      data = demjson.decode_file( "data.json", decimal_context=myctx )

  Note that Python's Decimal class will try to "store" all the
  significant digits originally present, including excess tailing
  zeros.  However any excess digits beyond the context's configuration
  will be lost as soon as any operation is performed on the value.


Version 2.1 - NOT RELEASED
============================
n/a


Version 2.0.1 released 2014-05-26
=================================
This is a re-packaging of 2.0, after discovering problems with
incorrect checksums in the PyPI distribution of 2.0.  No changes were
made from 2.0.


Version 2.0 released 2014-05-21
===============================

This is a major new version that contains many added features and
enhanced functionality, as well as a small number of backwards
incompatibilities.  Where possible these incompatibilities were kept
to a minimum, however it is highly recommended that you read these
change notes thoroughly.

 Major changes
 -------------

 * Python 2.6 minimum: Support has been dropped for really old
   versions of Python.  At least Python 2.6 or better is now required.

 * Python 3: This version works with both Python 2 and Python 3.
   Support for Python 3 is achieved with the 2to3 conversion program.
   When installing with setup.py or a PyPI distribution mechanism such
   as pip or easy_install, this conversion should automatically
   happen.

   Note that the API under Python 3 will be slightly different.
   Mainly new Python types are supported.  Also there will be some
   cases in which byte array types are used or returned rather than
   strings.

   Read the file "docs/PYTHON3.txt" for complete information.

 * RFC 7159 conformance: The latest RFC 7159 (published March 2014 and
   which superseded RFCs 4627 and 7158) relaxes the constraint that a
   JSON document must start with an object or array.  This also brings
   it into alignment with the ECMA-404 standard.

   Now any JSON value type is a legal JSON document.

 * Improved lint checking: A new JSON parsing engine has many
   improvements that make demjson better at "lint checking":

       - Generation of warnings as well as errors.

       - The position, line and column, of errors is reported; and in
         a standardized format.

       - Detection of potential data portability problems even when
         there are no errors.

       - Parser recovery from many errors, allowing for the
         reporting of multiple errors/warnings in one shot.

 * Statistics: The decoder can record and supply statistics
   on the input JSON document. This includes such things as
   the length of the longest string, the range of Unicode
   characters encountered, if any integers are larger than
   32-bit, 64-bit, or more; and much more.

   Use the --stats option of the jsonlint command.

 * Callback hooks: This version allows the user to provide a number
   of different callback functions, or hooks, which can do special
   processing.  For example when parsing JSON you could detect
   strings that look like dates, and automatically convert them
   into Python datetime objects instead.

   Read the file "docs/HOOKS.txt" for complete information.

 * Subclassing: Subclassing the demjson.JSON class is now highly
   discouraged as this version as well as future changes may alter the
   method names and parameters.

   In particular overriding the encode_default() method has been
   dropped; it will no longer work.

   The new callback hooks (see above) should provide a better
   way to achieve most needs that previously would have been done with
   subclassing.

 Data type support
 -----------------

 * Python 3 types: Many new types introduced with Python 3 are
   directly supported, when running in a Python 3 environment.  This
   includes 'bytes', 'bytearray', 'memoryview', 'Enum', and 'ChainMap'.

   Read the file "docs/PYTHON3.txt" for complete information.

 * Dates and times: When encoding to JSON, most of Python's standard
   date and time types (module 'datetime') will be automatically
   converted into the most universally-portable format; usually one of
   the formats specified by ISO-8601, and when possible the stricter
   syntax specified by the RFC 3339 subset.

   datetime.date
       Example output is "2014-02-17".
   datetime.datetime
       Example output is "2014-02-17T03:58:07.692005-05:00".
       The microseconds portion will not be included if it is zero.
       The timezone offset will not be present for naive datetimes,
       or will be the letter "Z" if UTC.
   datetime.time
       Example output is "T03:58:07.692005-05:00".
       Just like for datetime, the microseconds portion will not be
       included if it is zero.  The timezone offset will not be
       present for naive datetimes, or will be the letter "Z" if UTC.
   datetime.timedelta
       Example output is "P2DT6H17M23.873S", which is the ISO 8601
       standard format for time durations.

   It is possible to override the formats used with options, which all
   default to "iso".  Generally you may provide a format string
   compatible with the strftime() method. For timedelta the only
   choices are "iso" or "hms".

       import demjson, datetime

       demjson.encode( datetime.date.today(), date_format="%m/%d/%Y" )
       # gives =>    "02/17/2014"

       demjson.encode( datetime.datetime.now(), datetime_format="%a %I:%M %p" )
       # gives =>    "Mon 08:24 AM"

       demjson.encode( datetime.datetime.time(), datetime_format="%H hours %M min" )
       # gives =>    "08 hours 24 min"

       demjson.encode( datetime.timedelta(1,13000), timedelta_format="hms" )
       # gives =>    "1 day, 3:36:40"

 * Named tuples: When encoding to JSON, all named tuples (objects of
   Python's standard 'collections.namedtuple' type) are now encoded
   into JSON as objects rather than as arrays.  This behavior can be
   changed with the 'encode_namedtuple_as_object' argument to False,
   in which case they will be treated as a normal tuple.

       from collections import namedtuple
       Point = namedtuple('Point', ['x','y'])
       p = Point(5, 8)

       demjson.encode( p )
            # gives =>    {"x":5, "y":8}

       demjson.encode( p, encode_namedtuple_as_object=False )
            # gives =>    [5, 8]

   This behavior also applies to any object that follows the
   namedtuple protocol, i.e., which are subclasses of 'tuple' and that
   have an "_asdict()" method.

   Note that the order of keys is not necessarily preserved, but instead
   will appear in the JSON output alphabetically.

 * Enums: When encoding to JSON, all enumeration values (objects
   derived from Python's standard 'enum.Enum' type, introducted in
   Python 3.4) can be encoded in several ways.  The default is to
   encode the name as a string, though the 'encode_enum_as' option
   can change this.

       import demjson, enum
       class Fruit(enum.Enum):
           apple = 1
           bananna = 2
    
       demjson.encode( Fruit.bananna, encode_enum_as='name' ) # Default
       # gives =>    "bananna"

       demjson.encode( Fruit.bananna, encode_enum_as='qname' )
       # gives =>    "Fruit.bananna"

       demjson.encode( Fruit.bananna, encode_enum_as='value' )
       # gives =>    2

 * Mutable strings: Support for the old Python mutable strings (the
   UserDict.MutableString type) has been dropped.  That experimental
   type had already been deprecated since Python 2.6 and removed
   entirely from Python 3.  If you have code that passes a
   MutableString to a JSON encoding function then either do not
   upgrade to this release, or first convert such types to standard
   strings before JSON encoding them.

 Unicode and codec support
 -------------------------

 * Extended Unicode escapes: When reading JSON in non-strict mode any
   extended Unicode escape sequence, such as "\u{102E3C}", will be
   processed correctly.  This new escape sequence syntax was
   introduced in the latest versions of ECMAScript to make it easier
   to encode non-BMP characters into source code; they are not however
   allowed in strict JSON.

 * Codecs: The 'encoding' argument to the decode() and encode()
   functions will now accept a codec object as well as an encoding
   name; i.e., any subclass of 'codecs.CodecInfo'.  All \u-escaping in
   string literals will be automatically adjusted based on your custom
   codec's repertoire of characters.

 * UTF-32: The included functions for UTF-32/UCS-4 support (missing
   from older versions of Python) are now presented as a full-blown
   codec class: 'demjson.utf32'.  It is completely compatible with the
   standard codecs module.

   It is normally unregisted, but you may register it with the Python
   codecs system by:

       import demjson, codecs
       codecs.register( demjson.utf32.lookup )

 * Unicode errors: During reading or writing JSON as raw bytes (when
   an encoding is specified), any Unicode errors are now wrapped in a
   JSON error instead.

       - UnicodeDecodeError is transformed into JSONDecodeError
       - UnicodeEncodeError is transformed into JSONEncodeError

   The original exception is made available inside the top-most error
   using Python's Exception Chaining mechanism (described in the
   Errors and Warnings change notes).

 * Generating Unicode escapes: When outputting JSON certain additional
   characters in strings will now always be \u-escaped to increase
   compatibility with JavaScript.  This includes line terminators
   (which are forbidden in JavaScript string literals) as well as
   format control characters (which any JavaScript implementation is
   allowed to ignore if it chooses per the ECMAscript standard).

   This essentially means that characters in any of the Unicode
   categories of Cc, Cf, Zl, and Zp will always be \u-escaped; which
   includes for example:

       - U+007F  DELETE               (Category Cc)
       - U+00AD  SOFT HYPHEN          (Category Cf)
       - U+200F  RIGHT-TO-LEFT MARK   (Category Cf)
       - U+2028  LINE SEPARATOR       (Category Zl)
       - U+2029  PARAGRAPH SEPARATOR  (Category Zp)
       - U+E007F CANCEL TAG           (Category Cf)

 Exceptions (Errors)
 -------------------

 * Substitutions: During JSON decoding the parser can recover from
   some errors.  When this happens you may get back a Python
   representation of the JSON document that has had certain
   substitutions made:

     - Bad unicode characters (escapes, etc.) in strings will be
       substituted with the character U+FFFD <REPLACEMENT CHARACTER>,
       which is reserved by the Unicode standard specifically for this
       type of use.

     - Failure to decode a particular value, usually the result of
       syntax errors, will generally be represented in the Python
       result as the 'demjson.undefined' singleton object.

 * Error base type: The base error type 'JSONError' is now a subclass
   of Python's standard 'Exception' class rather than 'ValueError'.
   The new exception hierarchy is:

       Exception
       .   demjson.JSONException
       .   .   demjson.JSONSkipHook
       .   .   demjson.JSONStopProcessing
       .   .   demjson.JSONError
       .   .   .   demjson.JSONDecodeError
       .   .   .   .   demjson.JSONDecodeHookError
       .   .   .   demjson.JSONEncodeError
       .   .   .   .   demjson.JSONEncodeHookError

   If any code had been using 'try...except' blocks with 'ValueError'
   then you will need to change; preferably to catch 'JSONError'.

 * Exception chaining: Any errors that are incidentally raised during
   JSON encoding or decoding, such as UnicodeDecodeError or anything
   raised by user-supplied hook functions, will now be wrapped inside
   a standard JSONError (or subclass).

   When running in Python 3 the standard Exception Chaining (PEP 3134)
   mechanism is employed.  Under Python 2 exception chaining is
   simulated, but a printed traceback of the original exception may
   not be printed. The original exception is in the __cause__ member
   of the outer exception and it's traceback in the __traceback__
   member.

 The jsonlint command
 --------------------

 * The "jsonlint" command script will now be installed by default.

 * Error message format: All error messages, including warnings and
   such, now have a standardized output format.  This includes the
   file position (line and column), and any other context.

   The first line of each message begins with some colon-separated
   fields: filename, line number, column number, and severity.
   Subsequent lines of a message are indented.  A sample message might
   be:

       sample.json:6:0: Warning: Object contains duplicate key: 'title'
          |  At line 6, column 0, offset 72
          |  Object started at line 1, column 0, offset 0 (AT-START)

   This format is compatible with many developer tools, such as the
   emacs 'compile-mode' syntax, which can parse the error messages and
   place your cursor directly at the point of the error.

 * jsonlint class: Almost all the logic of the jsonlint script is now
   available as a new class, demjson.jsonlint, should you want to call
   it programatically.

   The included "jsonlint" script file is now just a very small
   wrapper around that class.

 * Other jsonlint improvements:

       - New -o option to specify output filename
       - Verbosity is on by default, new --quiet option
       - Output formatting is cleaner, and has options to control indenting
       - Better help text

 Other changes
 -------------

 * Sorting of object keys: When generating JSON there is now an
   option, 'sort_keys', to specify how the items within an object
   should be sorted.  The equivalent option is '--sort' for the
   jsonlint command.

   The new default is to do a 'smart' alphabetical-and-numeric sort,
   so for example keys would be sorted like:

       { "item-1":1, "ITEM-2":2, "Item-003":3, "item-10":10 }

   You can sort by any of:

      SORT_SMART: Smart alpha-numeric
      SORT_ALPHA: Alphabetical, case-sensitive (in string Unicode order)
      SORT_ALPHA_CI: Alphabetical, case-insensitive
      SORT_NONE: None (random, by hash table key)

      SORT_PRESERVE: Preserve original order if possible. This
            requires the Python OrderedDict type which was introduced
            in Python 2.7.  For all normal un-ordered dictionary types
            the sort order reverts to SORT_ALPHA.

      function: Any user-defined ordering function.

 * New JavaScript literals: The latest versions of JavaScript
   (ECMAScript) have introduced new literal syntax.  When not in
   strict mode, demjson will now recognize several of these:

     - Octal numbers, e.g., 0o731
     - Binary numbers, e.g., 0b1011
     - Extended unicode escapes, e.g., \u{13F0C}

 * Octal/decimal radix: Though not permitted in JSON, when in
   non-strict mode the decoder will allow numbers that begin with a
   leading zero digit.  Traditionally this has always been interpreted
   as being an octal numeral.  However recent versions of JavaScript
   (ECMAScript 5) have changed the language syntax to interpret
   numbers with leading zeros a decimal.

   Therefore demjson allows you to specify which radix should be used
   with the 'leading_zero_radix' option.  Only radix values of 8
   (octal) or 10 (decimal) are permitted, where octal remains the
   default.

       demjson.decode( '023', strict=False )
       # gives =>   19  (octal)

       demjson.decode( '023', strict=False, leading_zero_radix=10 )
       # gives =>   23  (decimal)

   The equivalent option for jsonlint is '--leading-zero-radix':

       $ echo "023" | jsonlint --quiet --format --leading-zero-radix=10
       23


 * version_info: In addition to the 'demjson.__version__' string,
   there is a new 'demjson.version_info' object that allows more
   specific version testing, such as by major version number.



Version 1.6 released 2011-04-01
===============================

 * Bug fix. The jsonlint tool failed to accept a JSON document from
   standard input (stdin).  Also added a --version and --copyright
   option support to jsonlint.  Thanks to Brian Bloniarz for reporting
   this bug.

 * No changes to the core demjson library/module was made, other
   than a version number bump.


Version 1.5 released 2010-10-10
===============================

 * Bug fix. When encoding Python strings to JSON, occurances of
   character U+00FF (ASCII 255 or 0xFF) may result in an error.
   Thanks to Tom Kho and Yanxin Shi for reporting this bug.


Version 1.4 released 2008-12-17
===============================

 * Changed license to LGPL 3 (GNU Lesser General Public License) or
   later.  Older versions still retain their original licenses.

 * No changes other than relicensing were made.


Version 1.3 released 2008-03-19

 * Change the default value of escape_unicode to False rather than
   True.

 * Parsing JSON strings was not strict enough.  Prohibit multi-line
   string literals in strict mode.  Also prohibit control characters
   U+0000 through U+001F inside string literals unless they are
   \u-escaped.

 * When in non-strict mode where object keys may be JavaScript
   identifiers, allow those identifiers to contain '$' and '_'.  Also
   introduce a method, decode_javascript_identifier(), which converts
   a JavaScript identifier into a Python string type, or can be
   overridden by a subclass to do something different.

 * Use the Python decimal module if available for representing
   numbers that can not fit into a float without loosing precision.
   Also encode decimal numbers into JSON and use them as a source
   for NaN and Infinity values if necessary.

 * Allow Python complex types to be encoded into JSON if their
   imaginary part is zero.

 * When parsing JSON numbers try to keep whole numbers as integers
   rather than floats; e.g., '1e+3' will be 1000 rather than 1000.0.
   Also make sure that overflows and underflows (even for the larger
   Decimal type) always result in Infinity or -Infinity values.

 * Handle more Python collection types when creating JSON; such as
   deque, set, array, and defaultdict.  Also fix a bug where UserDict
   was not properly handled because of it's unusual iter() behavior.


Version 1.2 released 2007-11-08
===============================

 * Changed license to GPL 3 or later.  Older versions still retain
   their original licenses.

 * Lint Validator: Added a "jsonlint" command-line utility for
   validating JSON data files, and/or reformatting them.

 * Major performance enhancements.  The most signifant of the many
   changes was to use a new strategy during encoding to use lists and
   fast list operations rather than slow string concatenation.

 * Floating-Point Precision: Fixed a bug which could cause loss of
   precision (e.g., number of significant digits) when encoding
   floating-point numbers into their JSON representation.  Also, the
   bundled test suite now properly tests floating-point encoding
   allowing for slight rounding errors which may naturally occur on
   some platforms.

 * Very Large Hex Numbers: Fixed a bug when decoding very large
   hexadecimal integers which could result in the wrong value for
   numbers larger than 0xffffffff.  Note that the language syntax
   allows such huge numbers, and since Python supports them too this
   module will decode such numbers.  However in practice very few
   other JSON or Javascript implementations support arbitrary-size
   integers.  Also hex numbers are not valid when in strict mode.

 * According to the JSON specification a document must start with
   either an object or an array type.  When in strict mode if the
   first non-whitespace object is any other type it should be
   considered to be an invalid document.  The previous version
   erroneously decoded any JSON value (e.g., it considered the
   document "1" to be valid when it should not have done so.
   Non-strict mode still allows any type, as well as by setting
   the new behavior flag 'allow_any_type_at_start'.

 * Exception Handling: Minor improvements in exception handling by
   removing most cases where unbounded catching was performed (i.e.,
   an "except:" with no specified exception types), excluding during
   module initialization.  This will make the module more
   caller-friendly, for instance by not catching and "hiding"
   KeyboardInterrupt or other asyncrhonous exceptions.

 * Identifier Parsing: The parser allows a more expanded syntax for
   Javascript identifiers which is more compliant with the ECMAscript
   standard.  This will allow, for example, underscores and dollar
   signs to appear in identifiers.  Also, to provide further
   information to the caller, rather than converting identifiers into
   Python strings they are converted to a special string-subclass.
   Thus they will look just like strings (and pass the
   "isinstance(x,basestring)" test), but the caller can do a type test
   to see if the value originated from Javascript identifiers or string literals.
   Note this only affects the non-strict (non-JSON) mode.

 * Fixed a liberal parsing bug which would successfully decode JSON
   ["a" "b"] into Python ['a', 'b'], rather than raising a syntax
   error for the missing comma.

 * Fixed a bug in the encode_default() method which raised the
   wrong kind of error.  Thanks to Nicolas Bonardelle.

 * Added more test cases to the bundled self-test program (see
   test/test_demjson.py).  There are now over 180 individual
   test cases being checked.


Version 1.1 released 2006-11-06
===============================

 * Extensive self testing code is now included, conforming to the
   standard Python unittest framework.  See the INSTALL.txt file for
   instructions.

 * Corrected character encoding sanity check which would erroneously
   complain if the input contained a newline or tab character within
   the first two characters.

 * The decode() and encode() top-level functions now allow additional
   keyword arguments to turn specific behaviors on or off that
   previously could only be done using the JSON class directly.  The
   keyword arguments look like 'allow_comments=True'.  Read the
   function docstrings for more information on this enhancement.

 * The decoding of supplementary Unicode character escape sequences
   (such as "\ud801\udc02") was broken on some versions of Python.
   These are now decoded explicitly without relying on Python so they
   always work.

 * Some Unicode encoding and decoding with UCS-4 or UTF-32 were not
   handled correctly.

 * Encoding of pseudo-string types from the UserString module are
   now correctly encoded as if real strings.

 * Improved simulation of nan, inf, and neginf classes used if the
   Python interpreter doesn't support IEEE 754 floating point math.

 * Updated the documentation to describe why this module does not
   permit multi-line string literals.


Version 1.0 released 2006-08-10
===============================

 * Initial public release