File: FAQ.txt

package info (click to toggle)
ruby-optimist 3.0.0-2
  • links: PTS, VCS
  • area: main
  • in suites: bookworm, bullseye, sid
  • size: 220 kB
  • sloc: ruby: 2,075; makefile: 4
file content (92 lines) | stat: -rw-r--r-- 4,224 bytes parent folder | download | duplicates (2)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
Optimist FAQ
-----------

Q: Why should I use Optimist?
A: Because it will take you fewer lines of code to parse commandline arguments
   than anything else out there.

   Like this:
     opts = Optimist::options do
       opt :monkey, "Use monkey mode"
       opt :goat, "Use goat mode", :default => true
       opt :num_limbs, "Set number of limbs", :default => 4
     end

   That's it. 'opts' will be a hash and you can do whatever you want with it.
   You don't have to mix processing code with the declarations. You don't have
   to make a class for every option (what is this, Java?). You don't have to
   write more than 1 line of code per option.

   Plus, you get a beautiful help screen that detects your terminal width and
   wraps appropriately.

Q: What is the philosophy behind Optimist?
A: Optimist does the parsing and gives you a hash table of options. You then
   write whatever fancy constraint logic you need as regular Ruby code operating
   on that hash table.

   (Optimist does support limited constraints (see #conflicts and #depends), but
   any non-trivial program will probably need to get fancier.)

   Then if you need to abort and tell the user to fix their command line at any
   point, you can call #die and Optimist will do that for you in a pretty way.

Q: What happens to the other stuff on the commandline?
A: Anything Optimist doesn't recognize as an option or as an option parameter is
   left in ARGV for you to process.

Q: Does Optimist support multiple-value arguments?
A: Yes. If you set the :type of an option to something plural, like ":ints",
   ":strings", ":doubles", ":floats", ":ios", it will accept multiple arguments
   on the commandline, and the value will be an array of the parameters.

Q: Does Optimist support arguments that can be given multiple times?
A: Yes. If you set :multi to true, then the argument can appear multiple times
   on the commandline, and the value will be an array of the parameters.

Q: Does Optimist support subcommands?
A: Yes: you can direct Optimist to stop processing when it encounters certain
   tokens. Then you can re-call Optimist with the subcommand-specific
   configuration to process the rest of the commandline.

   See the third example on the webpage.

   (And if you don't know the subcommands ahead of time, you can call
   #stop_on_unknown, which will cause Optimist to stop when it encounters any
   unknown token. This might be more trouble than its worth if you're also
   passing filenames on the commandline.)

Q: Why does Optimist disallow numeric short argument names, like '-1' and '-9'?
A: Because it's ambiguous whether these are arguments or negative integer or
   floating-point parameters to arguments. E.g., is "-f -3" a negative floating
   point parameter to -f, or two separate arguments?

Q: What was the big change in version 2.0?
A: The big change was boolean parameter (aka flag) handling. In pre-2.0,
   not specifying a flag on the commandline would result in the option being set
   to its default value; specifying it on the commandline would result in the
   option being set to the opposite of its default value. This was weird for
   options with a default of true:
     opt :magic, "Use magic", default: true
   Using --magic with the above configuration would result in a :magic => false
   value in the options hash.

   In 2.0, we introduce the GNU-style notion of a --no-x parameter. Now,
   specifying --x will always set the option :x to true, regardless of its
   default value, and specifying --no-x will always set the option :x to false,
   regardless of its default value. The default value only comes into play when
   neither form is given on the commandline.

   E.g.:
     opt :magic, "Use magic", :default => true

   Using --magic will result in :magic => true, and --no-magic will result in
   :magic => false, and neither will result in :magic => true.

   There is one exception: if the option itself starts with a "no_", then you'll
   get the opposite behavior:

     opt :no_magic, "Don't use magic", :default => true

   Using --magic will result in :no_magic => false, and --no-magic will result in
   :no_magic => true, and neither will result in :no_magic => true.