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<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"><title>Chapter�43.�Portability</title><link rel="stylesheet" href="../samba.css" type="text/css"><meta name="generator" content="DocBook XSL Stylesheets V1.75.2"><link rel="home" href="index.html" title="The Official Samba 3.5.x HOWTO and Reference Guide"><link rel="up" href="Appendix.html" title="Part�VI.�Reference Section"><link rel="prev" href="compiling.html" title="Chapter�42.�How to Compile Samba"><link rel="next" href="Other-Clients.html" title="Chapter�44.�Samba and Other CIFS Clients"></head><body bgcolor="white" text="black" link="#0000FF" vlink="#840084" alink="#0000FF"><div class="navheader"><table width="100%" summary="Navigation header"><tr><th colspan="3" align="center">Chapter�43.�Portability</th></tr><tr><td width="20%" align="left"><a accesskey="p" href="compiling.html">Prev</a>�</td><th width="60%" align="center">Part�VI.�Reference Section</th><td width="20%" align="right">�<a accesskey="n" href="Other-Clients.html">Next</a></td></tr></table><hr></div><div class="chapter" title="Chapter�43.�Portability"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h2 class="title"><a name="Portability"></a>Chapter�43.�Portability</h2></div><div><div class="author"><h3 class="author"><span class="firstname">Jelmer</span> <span class="othername">R.</span> <span class="surname">Vernooij</span></h3><div class="affiliation"><span class="orgname">The Samba Team<br></span><div class="address"><p><code class="email">&lt;<a class="email" href="mailto:jelmer@samba.org">jelmer@samba.org</a>&gt;</code></p></div></div></div></div><div><div class="author"><h3 class="author"><span class="firstname">John</span> <span class="othername">H.</span> <span class="surname">Terpstra</span></h3><div class="affiliation"><span class="orgname">Samba Team<br></span><div class="address"><p><code class="email">&lt;<a class="email" href="mailto:jht@samba.org">jht@samba.org</a>&gt;</code></p></div></div></div></div></div></div><div class="toc"><p><b>Table of Contents</b></p><dl><dt><span class="sect1"><a href="Portability.html#id450764">HPUX</a></span></dt><dt><span class="sect1"><a href="Portability.html#id450860">SCO UNIX</a></span></dt><dt><span class="sect1"><a href="Portability.html#id450891">DNIX</a></span></dt><dt><span class="sect1"><a href="Portability.html#id451021">Red Hat Linux</a></span></dt><dt><span class="sect1"><a href="Portability.html#id451060">AIX: Sequential Read Ahead</a></span></dt><dt><span class="sect1"><a href="Portability.html#id451114">Solaris</a></span></dt><dd><dl><dt><span class="sect2"><a href="Portability.html#id451119">Locking Improvements</a></span></dt><dt><span class="sect2"><a href="Portability.html#winbind-solaris9">Winbind on Solaris 9</a></span></dt></dl></dd></dl></div><p>
<a class="indexterm" name="id450749"></a>
<a class="indexterm" name="id450755"></a>
Samba works on a wide range of platforms, but the interface all the 
platforms provide is not always compatible. This chapter contains 
platform-specific information about compiling and using Samba.</p><div class="sect1" title="HPUX"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h2 class="title" style="clear: both"><a name="id450764"></a>HPUX</h2></div></div></div><p>
<a class="indexterm" name="id450772"></a>
<a class="indexterm" name="id450779"></a>
Hewlett-Packard's implementation of supplementary groups is nonstandard (for
historical reasons). There are two group files, <code class="filename">/etc/group</code> and
<code class="filename">/etc/logingroup</code>; the system maps UIDs to numbers using the former, but
initgroups() reads the latter. Most system admins who know the ropes
symlink <code class="filename">/etc/group</code> to <code class="filename">/etc/logingroup</code>
(hard-link does not work for reasons too obtuse to go into here). initgroups() will complain if one of the
groups you're in, in <code class="filename">/etc/logingroup</code>, has what it considers to be an invalid
ID, which means outside the range <code class="constant">[0..UID_MAX]</code>, where <code class="constant">UID_MAX</code> is
60000 currently on HP-UX. This precludes -2 and 65534, the usual <code class="constant">nobody</code>
GIDs.
</p><p>
If you encounter this problem, make sure the programs that are failing 
to initgroups() are run as users, not in any groups with GIDs outside the 
allowed range.
</p><p>
This is documented in the HP manual pages under setgroups(2) and passwd(4).
</p><p>
<a class="indexterm" name="id450843"></a>
<a class="indexterm" name="id450849"></a>
On HP-UX you must use gcc or the HP ANSI compiler. The free compiler
that comes with HP-UX is not ANSI compliant and cannot compile Samba.
</p></div><div class="sect1" title="SCO UNIX"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h2 class="title" style="clear: both"><a name="id450860"></a>SCO UNIX</h2></div></div></div><p> 
If you run an old version of SCO UNIX, you may need to get important 
TCP/IP patches for Samba to work correctly. Without the patch, you may 
encounter corrupt data transfers using Samba.
</p><p>
The patch you need is UOD385 Connection Drivers SLS. It is available from
SCO <a class="ulink" href="ftp://ftp.sco.com/" target="_top">ftp.sco.com</a>, directory SLS,
files uod385a.Z and uod385a.ltr.Z).
</p><p>
The information provided here refers to an old version of SCO UNIX. If you require
binaries for more recent SCO UNIX products, please contact SCO to obtain packages that are
ready to install. You should also verify with SCO that your platform is up to date for the
binary packages you will install. This is important if you wish to avoid data corruption
problems with your installation. To build Samba for SCO UNIX products  may
require significant patching of Samba source code. It is much easier to obtain binary
packages directly from SCO.
</p></div><div class="sect1" title="DNIX"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h2 class="title" style="clear: both"><a name="id450891"></a>DNIX</h2></div></div></div><p>
DNIX has a problem with seteuid() and setegid(). These routines are
needed for Samba to work correctly, but they were left out of the DNIX
C library for some reason.
</p><p>
For this reason Samba by default defines the macro NO_EID in the DNIX
section of includes.h. This works around the problem in a limited way,
but it is far from ideal, and some things still will not work right.
</p><p> 
To fix the problem properly, you need to assemble the following two
functions and then either add them to your C library or link them into
Samba. Put the following in the file <code class="filename">setegid.s</code>:
</p><pre class="programlisting">
        .globl  _setegid
_setegid:
        moveq   #47,d0
        movl    #100,a0
        moveq   #1,d1
        movl    4(sp),a1
        trap    #9
        bccs    1$
        jmp     cerror
1$:
        clrl    d0
        rts
</pre><p>
Put this in the file <code class="filename">seteuid.s</code>:
</p><pre class="programlisting">
        .globl  _seteuid
_seteuid:
        moveq   #47,d0
        movl    #100,a0
        moveq   #0,d1
        movl    4(sp),a1
        trap    #9
        bccs    1$
        jmp     cerror
1$:
        clrl    d0
        rts
</pre><p>
After creating the files, you then assemble them using
</p><pre class="screen">
<code class="prompt">$ </code><strong class="userinput"><code>as seteuid.s</code></strong>
<code class="prompt">$ </code><strong class="userinput"><code>as setegid.s</code></strong>
</pre><p>
which should produce the files <code class="filename">seteuid.o</code> and
<code class="filename">setegid.o</code>.
</p><p>
Next you need to add these to the LIBSM line in the DNIX section of
the Samba Makefile. Your LIBSM line will look something like this:
</p><pre class="programlisting">
LIBSM = setegid.o seteuid.o -ln
</pre><p>
You should then remove the line:
</p><pre class="programlisting">
#define NO_EID
</pre><p>from the DNIX section of <code class="filename">includes.h</code>.</p></div><div class="sect1" title="Red Hat Linux"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h2 class="title" style="clear: both"><a name="id451021"></a>Red Hat Linux</h2></div></div></div><p>
By default during installation, some versions of Red Hat Linux add an
entry to <code class="filename">/etc/hosts</code> as follows:
</p><pre class="programlisting">
127.0.0.1 loopback "hostname"."domainname"
</pre><p>
</p><p>
<a class="indexterm" name="id451044"></a>
This causes Samba to loop back onto the loopback interface.
The result is that Samba fails to communicate correctly with
the world and therefore may fail to correctly negotiate who
is the master browse list holder and who is the master browser.
</p><p>
Corrective action: Delete the entry after the word "loopback"
in the line starting 127.0.0.1.
</p></div><div class="sect1" title="AIX: Sequential Read Ahead"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h2 class="title" style="clear: both"><a name="id451060"></a>AIX: Sequential Read Ahead</h2></div></div></div><p>
Disabling sequential read ahead can improve Samba performance significantly
when there is a relatively high level of multiprogramming (many smbd processes
or mixed with another workload), not an abundance of physical memory or slower
disk technology. These can cause AIX to have a higher WAIT values. Disabling
sequential read-ahead can also have an adverse affect on other workloads in the
system so you will need to evaluate other applications for impact.
</p><p>
It is recommended to use the defaults provided by IBM, but if you experience a
high amount of wait time, try disabling read-ahead with the following commands:
</p><p>
For AIX 5.1 and earlier: <strong class="userinput"><code>vmtune -r 0</code></strong>
</p><p>
For AIX 5.2 and later jfs filesystems: <strong class="userinput"><code>ioo -o minpgahead=0</code></strong>
</p><p>
For AIX 5.2 and later jfs2 filesystems: <strong class="userinput"><code>ioo -o j2_minPageReadAhead=0</code></strong>
</p><p>
If you have a mix of jfs and jfs2 filesystems on the same host, simply use both
ioo commands.
</p></div><div class="sect1" title="Solaris"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h2 class="title" style="clear: both"><a name="id451114"></a>Solaris</h2></div></div></div><div class="sect2" title="Locking Improvements"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h3 class="title"><a name="id451119"></a>Locking Improvements</h3></div></div></div><p>Some people have been experiencing problems with F_SETLKW64/fcntl 
when running Samba on Solaris. The built-in file-locking mechanism was
not scalable. Performance would degrade to the point where processes would
get into loops of trying to lock a file. It would try a lock, then fail,
then try again. The lock attempt was failing before the grant was
occurring. The visible manifestation of this was a handful of
processes stealing all of the CPU, and when they were trussed, they would
be stuck in F_SETLKW64 loops.
</p><p>
Please check with Sun support for current patches needed to fix this bug.
The patch revision for 2.6 is 105181-34, for 8 is 108528-19, and for 9 is 112233-04.
After the installation of these patches, it is recommended to reconfigure
and rebuild Samba.
</p><p>Thanks to Joe Meslovich for reporting this.</p></div><div class="sect2" title="Winbind on Solaris 9"><div class="titlepage"><div><div><h3 class="title"><a name="winbind-solaris9"></a>Winbind on Solaris 9</h3></div></div></div><p>
Nsswitch on Solaris 9 refuses to use the Winbind NSS module. This behavior
is fixed by Sun in patch <a class="ulink" href="http://sunsolve.sun.com/search/advsearch.do?collection=PATCH&amp;type=collections&amp;max=50&amp;language=en&amp;queryKey5=112960;rev=14&amp;toDocument=yes" target="_top">112960-14</a>.
</p></div></div></div><div class="navfooter"><hr><table width="100%" summary="Navigation footer"><tr><td width="40%" align="left"><a accesskey="p" href="compiling.html">Prev</a>�</td><td width="20%" align="center"><a accesskey="u" href="Appendix.html">Up</a></td><td width="40%" align="right">�<a accesskey="n" href="Other-Clients.html">Next</a></td></tr><tr><td width="40%" align="left" valign="top">Chapter�42.�How to Compile Samba�</td><td width="20%" align="center"><a accesskey="h" href="index.html">Home</a></td><td width="40%" align="right" valign="top">�Chapter�44.�Samba and Other CIFS Clients</td></tr></table></div></body></html>