File: README.debian

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sash 3.7-12
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sash for DEBIAN
--------------------------
[random tips and comments]
--------------------------

In an emergency, you can run linux (just barely) with just the linux
kernel, a boot loader (such as lilo), and /bin/sash. Use the boot loader
to start linux with the option: init=/bin/sash

For a list of built-in sash commands, type help

You may or may not be able to log in using sash on a damaged system.
People with real experience on damaged systems who have simple
suggestions on how sash could be made more robust in this circumstance
are invited to file wishlist bugs against the sash package.

If you wish to avoid the overhead of rebooting in an emergency the best
option is probably to keep a sash root account always logged in. This
can be a security problem unless you lock the session with a program
such as vlock. At the moment, vlock is only useful at the linux console.


--------------------------

To take apart a debian .deb file with sash, use
-ar x filename.deb

This will create three files:
control.tar.gz data.tar.gz debian-binary

See section 7 of the debian FAQ (and the documentation it references)
for more details on the contents of the two tar.gz files (a copy of the
debian FAQ is supplied in the doc-debian package).


--------------------------

If you plan on being able to use sash for emergency repair work, make
sure that you understand what each of the built in commands does. This
is best accomplished by reading the manual page for the full featured
counterpart, and performing some controlled tests under non-emergency
conditions.

It's probably a also good idea to have a small partition with a copy
of the debian base system on it. There are some good low-level tools
for creating/repairing file systems, sash doesn't substitute for these.
Also, sash doesn't provide any networking tools. It's a good idea to
have a stock of rescue floppies, and distribution cdroms. And none of
these precautions substitute for decent backups.