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sepia 0.992-7
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* DESCRIPTION (-*- org -*-)
Sepia is a set of features to make Emacs a better tool for Perl
development, including:

    * an interactive prompt (REPL) for evaluating code;
    * cross-referencing to find and navigate between function and
      variable definitions and uses;
    * variable- and function-name completion.
    * eldoc support to echo function arguments in the minibuffer
    * functions to simplify POD browsing with Emacs-w3m

Please see the Sepia.html or sepia.info for documentation.
* INSTALLATION
The basic installation procedure is:

    1) run "perl Makefile.PL; make; make install"
    2) optionally, install w3m and Emacs-w3m
    3) put the elisp files somewhere Emacs will find them.

Sepia is developed on the latest version of GNU Emacs, which can be
obtained from CVS or as a prebuilt package on some platforms.  It can
run on other versions of Emacs, but may require additional packages.
** Requirements for GNU Emacs 22
*** (optional) emacs-w3m from http://emacs-w3m.namazu.org/
*** (optional) w3m from http://w3m.sourceforge.net/
*** (optional) snippet.el from http://www.kazmier.com/computer/snippet.el
** Additional requirements GNU Emacs 21
*** ido.el
    http://cvs.savannah.gnu.org/viewcvs/*checkout*/emacs/lisp/ido.el?root=emacs
*** FreeBSD may require the following packages:
    tree-widget-emacs21-2.0
    emacs-w3m-emacs21-1.4.4_2
    mule-ucs-emacs21-0.85.r3
    semi-emacs21-1.14.6_1
    wv-1.2.4
    xlhtml-0.5_1,1
    libgsf-1.14.3
    flim-emacs21-1.14.8
    apel-emacs21-10.7
    ja-nkf-2.05

* DEVELOPMENT
The "official" source code repository mirror is at

    http://repo.or.cz/w/sepia.git

To get a copy, install Git, then

    git clone git://repo.or.cz/sepia.git

To submit a patch, please send a diff to the author, including an
Emacs-style ChangeLog entry.
* TODO
** (Medium) Get the variable def/use analysis working again.
** (Hard) return from anything in the debugger
   Make it possible to return from intermediate calls in the debugger.
   Returning from die() is not often useful.

   This can be done with a clever DB::sub, but that dramatically slows
   down execution.
** (Medium) fix `sepia-beginning-of-defun' and `sepia-end-of-defun'.
   While they work for "normal" sub definitions, they fail on
   definitions that are all on one line, e.g.

       sub foo { ... }
       sub bar {
           ...
       }
** (Medium) Fix string escaping when passing between Perl and Emacs
   IO::Scalar's README tickles a bug.
** (Hard) Make the debugger's "next" work
   "next" (as opposed to "step") assumes that the next statement after
   line $n is line $n+1, which isn't true for loops, blank lines,
   multi-line statements, etc.  Fix this somehow.  One way might be to
   temporary regain control on a op_next/op_nextstate, or whatever
   those are called, but this would be hard and/or require XS.

   If we set $^P to populate @dbline, we can use that to find
   breakable lines, but that still doesn't fix backward branches in
   loops.
** (Medium) Make "finish" more reliable
   It currently assumes that the last breakable statement in a sub is
   one line before its end.  The "right" solution would be like above:
   to hook op_leave temporarily.  This would similarly require XS
   trickery.
** (Medium) Enable partial-word completion of lexicals
** (Hard) Rewrite completion code, which is pretty ugly now.
   This wouldn't seem "hard" but, having hacked on two completion
   codebases (Sepia's and complete.el's), I know there are always a
   lot of subtle cases to get right, and what acts "naturally" by
   human standards is extremely complicated to specify in code.
** (Easy) Document existing hooks and add_hook()/remove_hook()
@PRE_PROMPT, @PRE_EVAL, @POST_EVAL
** (Hard) Add appropriate hooks
   Possibly update existing functions to make use of hooks for better
   modularity.
* KNOWN BUGS
The following is a list of bugs that are difficult to automatically
reproduce, with the dates they were first observed.
** (2006-05-19) Function definition lines occasionally all go wrong.
   Rebuilding the Xref database fixes this.
** (2006-05-19) The cursor misses by several lines jumping to a definition.
   This is hard to fix -- Perl doesn't give exact line numbers for sub
   defs, so we have to do some minor regex-searching.
** (2006-05-19) `sepia-var-assigns' doesn't work yet -- don't use it.
** (2006-05-19) named method calls (mostly?) detected, but naively.
   Nothing smart is done about packages, so e.g. "new Foo" will result
   in listings for every instance of "new" in your program.
** (2008-01-18) the first value printed in the debugger is undef.  why?!
** (2009-12-13) completion deletes things it shouldn't
   e.g. $x->method => method.  I need to rewrite this code to not
   suck.
** (2010-09-30) <backspace> broken in view-mode
   <backspace> should scroll up if you enable view-mode, but for
   whatever reason it stays bound to hungry-delete.  I'm not sure if
   this is my fault, or cperl's.
** (2011-02-22) Sepia::Xref::load_pad segfaults
While traversing inside File::Find::contract_name.  Backtrace:
    #0  0x00000001001afa30 in XS_B__COP_hints_hash ()
    #1  0x00000001001b12ba in XS_B__GV_STASH ()
    #2  0x0000000100075708 in Perl_pp_entersub ()
    #3  0x000000010006e6cc in Perl_runops_standard ()
    #4  0x000000010006e43a in perl_run ()
* COPYRIGHT AND LICENCE
Copyright (C) 2004-2011 Sean O'Rourke

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the same terms as Perl itself, at the time at which this
version of Sepia was released.