File: snort.conf

package info (click to toggle)
snort 2.3.3-11
  • links: PTS
  • area: main
  • in suites: etch, etch-m68k
  • size: 22,512 kB
  • ctags: 11,344
  • sloc: ansic: 70,967; sh: 4,848; makefile: 748; perl: 478; sql: 212
file content (625 lines) | stat: -rw-r--r-- 22,980 bytes parent folder | download | duplicates (2)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
594
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
#--------------------------------------------------
#   http://www.snort.org     Snort 2.2.0 Ruleset
#     Contact: snort-sigs@lists.sourceforge.net
#--------------------------------------------------
# $Id: snort.conf,v 1.142.2.4 2004/09/27 15:36:37 bmc Exp $
#
###################################################
# This file contains a sample snort configuration. 
# You can take the following steps to create your own custom configuration:
#
#  1) Set the network variables for your network
#  2) Configure preprocessors
#  3) Configure output plugins
#  4) Customize your rule set
#
###################################################
# Step #1: Set the network variables:
#
# You must change the following variables to reflect your local network. The
# variable is currently setup for an RFC 1918 address space.
#
# You can specify it explicitly as: 
#
# var HOME_NET 10.1.1.0/24
#
# or use global variable $<interfacename>_ADDRESS which will be always
# initialized to IP address and netmask of the network interface which you run
# snort at.  Under Windows, this must be specified as
# $(<interfacename>_ADDRESS), such as:
# $(\Device\Packet_{12345678-90AB-CDEF-1234567890AB}_ADDRESS)
#
# var HOME_NET $eth0_ADDRESS
#
# You can specify lists of IP addresses for HOME_NET
# by separating the IPs with commas like this:
#
# var HOME_NET [10.1.1.0/24,192.168.1.0/24]
#
# MAKE SURE YOU DON'T PLACE ANY SPACES IN YOUR LIST!
#
# or you can specify the variable to be any IP address
# like this:

var HOME_NET any

# Set up the external network addresses as well.  A good start may be "any"
var EXTERNAL_NET any

# Configure your server lists.  This allows snort to only look for attacks to
# systems that have a service up.  Why look for HTTP attacks if you are not
# running a web server?  This allows quick filtering based on IP addresses
# These configurations MUST follow the same configuration scheme as defined
# above for $HOME_NET.  

# List of DNS servers on your network 
var DNS_SERVERS $HOME_NET

# List of SMTP servers on your network
var SMTP_SERVERS $HOME_NET

# List of web servers on your network
var HTTP_SERVERS $HOME_NET

# List of sql servers on your network 
var SQL_SERVERS $HOME_NET

# List of telnet servers on your network
var TELNET_SERVERS $HOME_NET

# List of snmp servers on your network
var SNMP_SERVERS $HOME_NET

# Configure your service ports.  This allows snort to look for attacks destined
# to a specific application only on the ports that application runs on.  For
# example, if you run a web server on port 8081, set your HTTP_PORTS variable
# like this:
#
# var HTTP_PORTS 8081
#
# Port lists must either be continuous [eg 80:8080], or a single port [eg 80].
# We will adding support for a real list of ports in the future.

# Ports you run web servers on
#
# Please note:  [80,8080] does not work.
# If you wish to define multiple HTTP ports,
# 
## var HTTP_PORTS 80 
## include somefile.rules 
## var HTTP_PORTS 8080
## include somefile.rules 
var HTTP_PORTS 80

# Ports you want to look for SHELLCODE on.
var SHELLCODE_PORTS !80

# Ports you do oracle attacks on
var ORACLE_PORTS 1521

# other variables
# 
# AIM servers.  AOL has a habit of adding new AIM servers, so instead of
# modifying the signatures when they do, we add them to this list of servers.
var AIM_SERVERS [64.12.24.0/23,64.12.28.0/23,64.12.161.0/24,64.12.163.0/24,64.12.200.0/24,205.188.3.0/24,205.188.5.0/24,205.188.7.0/24,205.188.9.0/24,205.188.153.0/24,205.188.179.0/24,205.188.248.0/24]

# Path to your rules files (this can be a relative path)
# Note for Windows users:  You are advised to make this an absolute path,
# such as:  c:\snort\rules
var RULE_PATH ../rules

# Configure the snort decoder
# ============================
#
# Snort's decoder will alert on lots of things such as header
# truncation or options of unusual length or infrequently used tcp options
#
#
# Stop generic decode events:
#
# config disable_decode_alerts
#
# Stop Alerts on experimental TCP options
#
# config disable_tcpopt_experimental_alerts
#
# Stop Alerts on obsolete TCP options
#
# config disable_tcpopt_obsolete_alerts
#
# Stop Alerts on T/TCP alerts
#
# In snort 2.0.1 and above, this only alerts when a TCP option is detected
# that shows T/TCP being actively used on the network.  If this is normal
# behavior for your network, disable the next option.
#
# config disable_tcpopt_ttcp_alerts
#
# Stop Alerts on all other TCPOption type events:
#
# config disable_tcpopt_alerts
#
# Stop Alerts on invalid ip options
#
# config disable_ipopt_alerts

# Configure the detection engine
# ===============================
#
# Use a different pattern matcher in case you have a machine with very limited
# resources:
#
# config detection: search-method lowmem

###################################################
# Step #2: Configure preprocessors
#
# General configuration for preprocessors is of 
# the form
# preprocessor <name_of_processor>: <configuration_options>

# Configure Flow tracking module
# -------------------------------
#
# The Flow tracking module is meant to start unifying the state keeping
# mechanisms of snort into a single place. Right now, only a portscan detector
# is implemented but in the long term,  many of the stateful subsystems of
# snort will be migrated over to becoming flow plugins. This must be enabled
# for flow-portscan to work correctly.
#
# See README.flow for additional information
#
preprocessor flow: stats_interval 0 hash 2

# frag2: IP defragmentation support
# -------------------------------
# This preprocessor performs IP defragmentation.  This plugin will also detect
# people launching fragmentation attacks (usually DoS) against hosts.  No
# arguments loads the default configuration of the preprocessor, which is a 60
# second timeout and a 4MB fragment buffer. 

# The following (comma delimited) options are available for frag2
#    timeout [seconds] - sets the number of [seconds] that an unfinished 
#                        fragment will be kept around waiting for completion,
#                        if this time expires the fragment will be flushed
#    memcap [bytes] - limit frag2 memory usage to [number] bytes
#                      (default:  4194304)
#
#    min_ttl [number] - minimum ttl to accept
# 
#    ttl_limit [number] - difference of ttl to accept without alerting
#                         will cause false positves with router flap
# 
# Frag2 uses Generator ID 113 and uses the following SIDS 
# for that GID:
#  SID     Event description
# -----   -------------------
#   1       Oversized fragment (reassembled frag > 64k bytes)
#   2       Teardrop-type attack

preprocessor frag2

# stream4: stateful inspection/stream reassembly for Snort
#----------------------------------------------------------------------
# Use in concert with the -z [all|est] command line switch to defeat stick/snot
# against TCP rules.  Also performs full TCP stream reassembly, stateful
# inspection of TCP streams, etc.  Can statefully detect various portscan
# types, fingerprinting, ECN, etc.

# stateful inspection directive
# no arguments loads the defaults (timeout 30, memcap 8388608)
# options (options are comma delimited):
#   detect_scans - stream4 will detect stealth portscans and generate alerts
#                  when it sees them when this option is set
#   detect_state_problems - detect TCP state problems, this tends to be very
#                           noisy because there are a lot of crappy ip stack
#                           implementations out there
#
#   disable_evasion_alerts - turn off the possibly noisy mitigation of
#                            overlapping sequences.
#
#
#   min_ttl [number]       - set a minium ttl that snort will accept to
#                            stream reassembly
#
#   ttl_limit [number]     - differential of the initial ttl on a session versus
#                             the normal that someone may be playing games.
#                             Routing flap may cause lots of false positives.
# 
#   keepstats [machine|binary] - keep session statistics, add "machine" to 
#                         get them in a flat format for machine reading, add
#                         "binary" to get them in a unified binary output 
#                         format
#   noinspect - turn off stateful inspection only
#   timeout [number] - set the session timeout counter to [number] seconds,
#                      default is 30 seconds
#   memcap [number] - limit stream4 memory usage to [number] bytes
#   log_flushed_streams - if an event is detected on a stream this option will
#                         cause all packets that are stored in the stream4
#                         packet buffers to be flushed to disk.  This only 
#                         works when logging in pcap mode!
#
# Stream4 uses Generator ID 111 and uses the following SIDS 
# for that GID:
#  SID     Event description
# -----   -------------------
#   1       Stealth activity
#   2       Evasive RST packet
#   3       Evasive TCP packet retransmission
#   4       TCP Window violation
#   5       Data on SYN packet
#   6       Stealth scan: full XMAS
#   7       Stealth scan: SYN-ACK-PSH-URG
#   8       Stealth scan: FIN scan
#   9       Stealth scan: NULL scan
#   10      Stealth scan: NMAP XMAS scan
#   11      Stealth scan: Vecna scan
#   12      Stealth scan: NMAP fingerprint scan stateful detect
#   13      Stealth scan: SYN-FIN scan
#   14      TCP forward overlap

preprocessor stream4: disable_evasion_alerts

# tcp stream reassembly directive
# no arguments loads the default configuration 
#   Only reassemble the client,
#   Only reassemble the default list of ports (See below),  
#   Give alerts for "bad" streams
#
# Available options (comma delimited):
#   clientonly - reassemble traffic for the client side of a connection only
#   serveronly - reassemble traffic for the server side of a connection only
#   both - reassemble both sides of a session
#   noalerts - turn off alerts from the stream reassembly stage of stream4
#   ports [list] - use the space separated list of ports in [list], "all" 
#                  will turn on reassembly for all ports, "default" will turn
#                  on reassembly for ports 21, 23, 25, 53, 80, 143, 110, 111
#                  and 513

preprocessor stream4_reassemble

# http_inspect: normalize and detect HTTP traffic and protocol anomalies
#
# lots of options available here. See doc/README.http_inspect.
# unicode.map should be wherever your snort.conf lives, or given
# a full path to where snort can find it.
preprocessor http_inspect: global \
    iis_unicode_map unicode.map 1252 

preprocessor http_inspect_server: server default \
    profile all ports { 80 8080 8180 } oversize_dir_length 500

#
#  Example unqiue server configuration
#
#preprocessor http_inspect_server: server 1.1.1.1 \
#    ports { 80 3128 8080 } \
#    flow_depth 0 \
#    ascii no \
#    double_decode yes \
#    non_rfc_char { 0x00 } \
#    chunk_length 500000 \
#    non_strict \
#    oversize_dir_length 300 \
#    no_alerts


# rpc_decode: normalize RPC traffic
# ---------------------------------
# RPC may be sent in alternate encodings besides the usual 4-byte encoding
# that is used by default. This plugin takes the port numbers that RPC
# services are running on as arguments - it is assumed that the given ports
# are actually running this type of service. If not, change the ports or turn
# it off.
# The RPC decode preprocessor uses generator ID 106
#
# arguments: space separated list
# alert_fragments - alert on any rpc fragmented TCP data
# no_alert_multiple_requests - don't alert when >1 rpc query is in a packet
# no_alert_large_fragments - don't alert when the fragmented
#                            sizes exceed the current packet size
# no_alert_incomplete - don't alert when a single segment
#                       exceeds the current packet size

preprocessor rpc_decode: 111 32771

# bo: Back Orifice detector
# -------------------------
# Detects Back Orifice traffic on the network.  Takes no arguments in 2.0.
# 
# The Back Orifice detector uses Generator ID 105 and uses the 
# following SIDS for that GID:
#  SID     Event description
# -----   -------------------
#   1       Back Orifice traffic detected

preprocessor bo

# telnet_decode: Telnet negotiation string normalizer
# ---------------------------------------------------
# This preprocessor "normalizes" telnet negotiation strings from telnet and ftp
# traffic.  It works in much the same way as the http_decode preprocessor,
# searching for traffic that breaks up the normal data stream of a protocol and
# replacing it with a normalized representation of that traffic so that the
# "content" pattern matching keyword can work without requiring modifications.
# This preprocessor requires no arguments.
# Portscan uses Generator ID 109 and does not generate any SID currently.

preprocessor telnet_decode

# Flow-Portscan: detect a variety of portscans
# ---------------------------------------
# Note:  The Flow preprocessor (above) must first be enabled for Flow-Portscan to
# work.
#
# This module detects portscans based off of flow creation in the flow
# preprocessors.  The goal is to catch one->many hosts and one->many
# ports scans.
#
# Flow-Portscan has numerous options available, please read
# README.flow-portscan for help configuring this option. 

# Flow-Portscan uses Generator ID 121 and uses the following SIDS for that GID:
#  SID     Event description
# -----   -------------------
#   1       flow-portscan: Fixed Scale Scanner Limit Exceeded
#   2       flow-portscan: Sliding Scale Scanner Limit Exceeded 
#   3       flow-portscan: Fixed Scale Talker Limit Exceeded
#   4	    flow-portscan: Sliding Scale Talker Limit Exceeded

# preprocessor flow-portscan: \
#	talker-sliding-scale-factor 0.50 \
#	talker-fixed-threshold 30 \
#	talker-sliding-threshold 30 \
#	talker-sliding-window 20 \
#	talker-fixed-window 30 \
#	scoreboard-rows-talker 30000 \
#	server-watchnet [10.2.0.0/30] \
#	server-ignore-limit 200 \
#	server-rows 65535 \
#	server-learning-time 14400 \
#	server-scanner-limit 4 \
#	scanner-sliding-window 20 \
#	scanner-sliding-scale-factor 0.50 \
#	scanner-fixed-threshold 15 \
#	scanner-sliding-threshold 40 \
#	scanner-fixed-window 15 \
#	scoreboard-rows-scanner 30000 \
#	src-ignore-net [192.168.1.1/32,192.168.0.0/24] \
#	dst-ignore-net [10.0.0.0/30] \
#	alert-mode once \
#	output-mode msg \
#	tcp-penalties on

# arpspoof
#----------------------------------------
# Experimental ARP detection code from Jeff Nathan, detects ARP attacks,
# unicast ARP requests, and specific ARP mapping monitoring.  To make use of
# this preprocessor you must specify the IP and hardware address of hosts on
# the same layer 2 segment as you.  Specify one host IP MAC combo per line.
# Also takes a "-unicast" option to turn on unicast ARP request detection. 
# Arpspoof uses Generator ID 112 and uses the following SIDS for that GID:

#  SID     Event description
# -----   -------------------
#   1       Unicast ARP request
#   2       Etherframe ARP mismatch (src)
#   3       Etherframe ARP mismatch (dst)
#   4       ARP cache overwrite attack

#preprocessor arpspoof
#preprocessor arpspoof_detect_host: 192.168.40.1 f0:0f:00:f0:0f:00


# Performance Statistics
# ----------------------
# Documentation for this is provided in the Snort Manual.  You should read it.
# It is included in the release distribution as doc/snort_manual.pdf
# 
# preprocessor perfmonitor: time 300 file /var/snort/snort.stats pktcnt 10000

####################################################################
# Step #3: Configure output plugins
#
# Uncomment and configure the output plugins you decide to use.  General
# configuration for output plugins is of the form:
#
# output <name_of_plugin>: <configuration_options>
#
# alert_syslog: log alerts to syslog
# ----------------------------------
# Use one or more syslog facilities as arguments.  Win32 can also optionally
# specify a particular hostname/port.  Under Win32, the default hostname is
# '127.0.0.1', and the default port is 514.
#
# [Unix flavours should use this format...]
# output alert_syslog: LOG_AUTH LOG_ALERT
#
# [Win32 can use any of these formats...]
# output alert_syslog: LOG_AUTH LOG_ALERT
# output alert_syslog: host=hostname, LOG_AUTH LOG_ALERT
# output alert_syslog: host=hostname:port, LOG_AUTH LOG_ALERT

# log_tcpdump: log packets in binary tcpdump format
# -------------------------------------------------
# The only argument is the output file name.
#
# output log_tcpdump: tcpdump.log

# database: log to a variety of databases
# ---------------------------------------
# See the README.database file for more information about configuring
# and using this plugin.
#
# output database: log, mysql, user=root password=test dbname=db host=localhost
# output database: alert, postgresql, user=snort dbname=snort
# output database: log, odbc, user=snort dbname=snort
# output database: log, mssql, dbname=snort user=snort password=test
# output database: log, oracle, dbname=snort user=snort password=test

# unified: Snort unified binary format alerting and logging
# -------------------------------------------------------------
# The unified output plugin provides two new formats for logging and generating
# alerts from Snort, the "unified" format.  The unified format is a straight
# binary format for logging data out of Snort that is designed to be fast and
# efficient.  Used with barnyard (the new alert/log processor), most of the
# overhead for logging and alerting to various slow storage mechanisms such as
# databases or the network can now be avoided.  
#
# Check out the spo_unified.h file for the data formats.
#
# Two arguments are supported.
#    filename - base filename to write to (current time_t is appended)
#    limit    - maximum size of spool file in MB (default: 128)
#
# output alert_unified: filename snort.alert, limit 128
# output log_unified: filename snort.log, limit 128

# You can optionally define new rule types and associate one or more output
# plugins specifically to that type.
#
# This example will create a type that will log to just tcpdump.
# ruletype suspicious
# {
#   type log
#   output log_tcpdump: suspicious.log
# }
#
# EXAMPLE RULE FOR SUSPICIOUS RULETYPE:
# suspicious tcp $HOME_NET any -> $HOME_NET 6667 (msg:"Internal IRC Server";)
#
# This example will create a rule type that will log to syslog and a mysql
# database:
# ruletype redalert
# {
#   type alert
#   output alert_syslog: LOG_AUTH LOG_ALERT
#   output database: log, mysql, user=snort dbname=snort host=localhost
# }
#
# EXAMPLE RULE FOR REDALERT RULETYPE:
# redalert tcp $HOME_NET any -> $EXTERNAL_NET 31337 \
#   (msg:"Someone is being LEET"; flags:A+;)

#
# Include classification & priority settings
# Note for Windows users:  You are advised to make this an absolute path,
# such as:  c:\snort\etc\classification.config
#

include classification.config

#
# Include reference systems
# Note for Windows users:  You are advised to make this an absolute path,
# such as:  c:\snort\etc\reference.config
#

include reference.config

####################################################################
# Step #4: Customize your rule set
#
# Up to date snort rules are available at http://www.snort.org
#
# The snort web site has documentation about how to write your own custom snort
# rules.
#
# The rules included with this distribution generate alerts based on on
# suspicious activity. Depending on your network environment, your security
# policies, and what you consider to be suspicious, some of these rules may
# either generate false positives ore may be detecting activity you consider to
# be acceptable; therefore, you are encouraged to comment out rules that are
# not applicable in your environment.
#
# The following individuals contributed many of rules in this distribution.
#
# Credits:
#   Ron Gula <rgula@securitywizards.com> of Network Security Wizards
#   Max Vision <vision@whitehats.com>
#   Martin Markgraf <martin@mail.du.gtn.com>
#   Fyodor Yarochkin <fygrave@tigerteam.net>
#   Nick Rogness <nick@rapidnet.com>
#   Jim Forster <jforster@rapidnet.com>
#   Scott McIntyre <scott@whoi.edu>
#   Tom Vandepoel <Tom.Vandepoel@ubizen.com>
#   Brian Caswell <bmc@snort.org>
#   Zeno <admin@cgisecurity.com>
#   Ryan Russell <ryan@securityfocus.com>



#=========================================
# Include all relevant rulesets here 
# 
# The following rulesets are disabled by default:
#
#   web-attacks, backdoor, shellcode, policy, porn, info, icmp-info, virus,
#   chat, multimedia, and p2p
#            
# These rules are either site policy specific or require tuning in order to not
# generate false positive alerts in most enviornments.
# 
# Please read the specific include file for more information and
# README.alert_order for how rule ordering affects how alerts are triggered.
#=========================================

include $RULE_PATH/local.rules
include $RULE_PATH/bad-traffic.rules
include $RULE_PATH/exploit.rules
include $RULE_PATH/scan.rules
include $RULE_PATH/finger.rules
include $RULE_PATH/ftp.rules
include $RULE_PATH/telnet.rules
include $RULE_PATH/rpc.rules
include $RULE_PATH/rservices.rules
include $RULE_PATH/dos.rules
include $RULE_PATH/ddos.rules
include $RULE_PATH/dns.rules
include $RULE_PATH/tftp.rules

include $RULE_PATH/web-cgi.rules
include $RULE_PATH/web-coldfusion.rules
include $RULE_PATH/web-iis.rules
include $RULE_PATH/web-frontpage.rules
include $RULE_PATH/web-misc.rules
include $RULE_PATH/web-client.rules
include $RULE_PATH/web-php.rules

include $RULE_PATH/sql.rules
include $RULE_PATH/x11.rules
include $RULE_PATH/icmp.rules
include $RULE_PATH/netbios.rules
include $RULE_PATH/misc.rules
include $RULE_PATH/attack-responses.rules
include $RULE_PATH/oracle.rules
include $RULE_PATH/mysql.rules
include $RULE_PATH/snmp.rules

include $RULE_PATH/smtp.rules
include $RULE_PATH/imap.rules
include $RULE_PATH/pop2.rules
include $RULE_PATH/pop3.rules

include $RULE_PATH/nntp.rules
include $RULE_PATH/other-ids.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/web-attacks.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/backdoor.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/shellcode.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/policy.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/porn.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/info.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/icmp-info.rules
 include $RULE_PATH/virus.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/chat.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/multimedia.rules
# include $RULE_PATH/p2p.rules
include $RULE_PATH/experimental.rules

# Include any thresholding or suppression commands. See threshold.conf in the
# <snort src>/etc directory for details. Commands don't necessarily need to be
# contained in this conf, but a separate conf makes it easier to maintain them. 
# Note for Windows users:  You are advised to make this an absolute path,
# such as:  c:\snort\etc\threshold.conf
# Uncomment if needed.
# include threshold.conf