File: INSTALL

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sox 12.16-6
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SoX: Sound eXchange Installation

This distribution will compile and run on most Unix systems.
It was originally developed on a Unix/386 machine running AT&T V.3.2
but its currently developed under Linux.  With little work it should
work with most SVR4 systems, BSD-derived Unix's and DOS systems that
use the GNU tool set.

Compiling
---------

The perfered method for compiling sox is to use the "configure" scripts
compatible with most unix systems that contain "/bin/sh" or equivalent
(even the Win95/NT Cygwin setup will work with this).

To compile SoX on these platforms run the following commands:

    ./configure
    make
    make install

You should then have a working version of sox in the directory.  There
are several optional parameters that you may pass to the configure
script to customize SoX for your applications.  Run "./configure --help"
for a complete list of options.

If your system works with the "configure" script then you may skip
to the Testing section.

If your system does not work with the configure scripts then there are
several canned "Makefile"'s that you can use.  The following systems
have a canned Makefile:

    AMIGA      Makefile.ami (hasn't been verified lately)
    DOS        Makefile.dos (Borland and Turbo C)
	    or Makefile.unx (using GCC compatible compiler)
    OS/2       Makefile.unx (using EMX GCC compiler)
    OS9        Makefile.os9
    UNIX       Makefile.unx (or most platforms using GCC compatible compiler)
    VMS        descrip.mms & sox.opt (Support is outdated.  Read vms.lis)
    WIN95/NT   Makefile.unx (using Cynus GCC for Win32)
            or Makefile.dos (with a little modifying for Visual C++)

You can run the makefile on most systems by using the following
command line:

make -f Makefile.name      or
make -fMakefile.name

Before compiling with a canned Makefile you will need to edit the 
Makefile and uncomment the compiler define section related to your 
operating system and possibly comment out any previous system defines.

There are a few additional defines available for your operating 
system to add things such as sound playing support.  This is 
generally documented in the Makefiles

There is optional GSM support as a data type but you must first
install the GSM library on your system.  More information on it
can be obtained from http://www.cs.tu-berlin.de/~jutta/toast.html
After installing the GSM library you must point to this file by
commenting and modifying the appropriate section of the Makefile.

If you're processing lots of u-law or a-law files, you should
define FAST_ULAW_COMPRESSION and/or FAST_ALAW_COMPRESSION in your 
Makefile.  These substitute a table-based method for the standard method.
The tables are 32K, so if you don't want them, you don't have to
use them.

Testing
-------

After successfully compiling SOX, try translating a sound file.
If you can play one of the supported sound file formats,
translate 'monkey.voc' to your format (we'll use 'xxx'):

	sox monkey.voc monkey.xxx

You may have to give the word size and rate for the file.
For example, this command will make a sound file with a data rate of
12,500 samples per second and the data formatted as signed shorts:

	sox monkey.voc -r 12500 -s -w monkey.xxx 

If monkey.xxx plays properly (it's a very short monkey screech),
congratulations!  SoX works.  Now you should run the "tests.sh"
shell script if your running under a unix varient to exercise 
various test scenarios.  It should print nothing out.  You can also
run tests.bat under DOS for similar tests. 

After that, "testall.sh" ("testall.bat for DOS) tests most of the 
implemented file handlers to make sure that some portability issue 
haven't popped up