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strongswan 5.2.1-6+deb8u2~bpo70+1
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strongswan (5.1.2-1) unstable; urgency=medium

  Starting 5.1.2, strongSwan natively support a configuration directory (in
  /etc/strongswan.d/). This replaces the /etc/strongswan.conf.d/ configuration
  directly which was added in 5.1.1-1.
  .
  More information can be found on the strongswan.d configuration mechanism on
  the upstream commit [1] and user documenation [2].
  .
  In Debian, these configurations directories are especially use to easily
  toggle the loading of the various plugins shipped with the Debian packages.
  Upstream defaults to load the plugins,  and this can be overridden by
  changing the files in /etc/strongswan.d. As those latter files are tracked
  as configuration files, modifications won't be reverted when the package is
  upgraded. Default settings for the plugins can be found in the templates dir
  in the /usr/share/strongswan/templates/config folder.
  .
  [1]: http://wiki.strongswan.org/projects/strongswan/repository/revisions/55015036183c47692c2e2349a4c59bf00c107986
  [2]: http://wiki.strongswan.org/projects/strongswan/wiki/StrongswanDirectory

 -- Yves-Alexis Perez <corsac@debian.org>  Wed, 12 Mar 2014 10:31:44 +0100

strongswan (5.1.1-2+splitplugins) experimental; urgency=medium

  In 5.1.1-2 package, few plugins have been split from the main libstrongswan
  package. The plugins are now in following packages:
    - libstrongswan: main/default plugins, as defined by the strongSwan
    project
    - libstrongswan-standard-plugins: non default but useful plugins (agent,
    gcm and openssl)
    - libstrongswan-extra-plugins: more scarcely used plugins
    - libcharon-extra-plugins: more scarecely used plugins for the charon
    daemon

  WARNING: this is an experimental release of the packaging, use at your own
  risk.

 -- Yves-Alexis Perez <corsac@debian.org>  Sun, 02 Feb 2014 20:05:15 +0100

strongswan (5.1.0-1) unstable; urgency=low

  Starting with strongSwan 5, the IKEv1 daemon (pluto) is gone, and the charon
  daemon is now able to handle both IKEv1 and IKEv2 protocols.

  There should be no issue for previous charon users, but for pluto users that
  means they need to re-configure strongSwan in order to use charon. Some
  migration help can be found on the strongSwan website at
  http://wiki.strongswan.org/projects/strongswan/wiki/CharonPlutoIKEv1 and in
  some IKEv1 configuration examples at
  http://wiki.strongswan.org/projects/strongswan/wiki/IKEv1Examples.

 -- Yves-Alexis Perez <corsac@debian.org>  Mon, 30 Sep 2013 20:43:03 +0200

strongswan (4.5.0-1) unstable; urgency=low

  Starting with strongswan 4.5.0 upstream, the IKEv2 protocol is now the
  default. This can easily be changed using the keyexchange=ikev1 config
  option (either in the respective "conn" section or by putting it in the
  "default" section and therefore applying it to all existing connections).

  The IKEv2 protocol has less overhead, more features (e.g. NAT-Traversal by
  default, MOBIKE, Mobile IPv6), and provides better error messages in case
  the connection can not be established. It is therefore highly recommended
  to use it when the other side also supports it.
  
  Addtionally, strongswan 4.5.0-1 now enables support for NAT Traversal in
  combination with IPsec transport mode (the support for this has existed 
  for a long time, but was disabled due to security concerns). This is 
  required e.g. to let mobile phone clients (notably Android, iPhone) 
  connect to an L2TP/IPsec gateway using strongswan. The security 
  implications as described in the original README.NAT-Traversal file from 
  the openswan distribution are:
  
  * Transport Mode can't be used without NAT in the IPSec layer. Otherwise,
    all packets for the NAT device (including all hosts behind it) would be
    sent to the NAT-T Client. This would create a sort of blackhole between
    the peer which is not behind NAT and the NAT device.

  * In Tunnel Mode with roadwarriors, we CAN'T accept any IP address,
    otherwise, an evil roadwarrior could redirect all trafic for one host
    (including a host on the private network) to himself. That's why, you have
    to specify the private IP in the configuration file, use virtual IP
    management, or DHCP-over-IPSec.

 -- Rene Mayrhofer <rmayr@debian.org>  Sun,  28 Nov 2010 13:16:00 +0200

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