File: README.Debian

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strongswan 5.2.1-6+deb8u2~bpo70+1
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strongswan for Debian
----------------------

1) General Remarks

This package has been created from the openswan package, which was again
created from the freeswan package, which was created from scratch with some 
ideas from the freeswan 1.3 package by Tommi Virtanen and the freeswan 1.5 
package by Aaron Johnson merged in.

The differences between the strongSwan and the Openswan packages are 
documented at http://www.strongswan.org/ .

2) Kernel Support

Note: This package can make use of the in-kernel IPSec stack, which is
available in the stock Debian kernel images (>=2.4.24 and 2.6.x). 

If you want to use the strongswan utilities, you will need the appropriate
kernel modules. The Debian default kernel native IPSec stack (which is 
included in Linux 2.6 kernels and has been backported to Debian's 2.4 kernels) 
can be used out-of-the-box with strongswan pluto, the key management daemon. 
This native Linux IPSec stack is of high quality, has all of the features of 
the latest Debian freeswan and openswan packages (i.e. support for other
ciphers like AES and NAT Traversal support) and is well integrated into the
kernel networking subsystem (which is not true for the freeswan kernel
modules). This is the recommended kernel support for strongswan.

If you do not want to use the in-kernel IPSec stack of newer 2.6 kernels or 
are building a custom 2.4 kernel, then the KLIPS kernel part can be used.
strongswan no longer ships this part, but is instead focussing on the newer
native IPSec stack. However, strongswan is interoperable with the KLIPS part
shipped with openswan, both for 2.4 and 2.6 series kernels. Please install 
either the linux-patch-openswan or the openswan-modules-source packages and
follow their respective README.Debian files when you want to use KLIPS.

3) Getting Started

For connecting two Debian boxes using this strongswan package, the
simplest connection block on each side would look something like this:

On host A, use

conn to_hostb
        left=%defaultroute
	right=hostb.example.com
	leftcert=hosta.pem
        rightcert=hostb.pem
        keyexchange=ikev2
        type=transport
        auto=add

On host B, use
conn to_hosta
	left=%defaultroute
	right=hosta.example.com
	leftcert=hostb.pem
	rightcert=hosta.pem
	keyexchange=ikev2
	type=transport
	auto=add

This assumes that the respective hostnames hosta.example.com and 
hostb.example.com can be resolved and that the internal hostnames are hosta
and hostb (and thus installing the strongswan package created the certificates
hosta.pem and hostb.pem, respectively). 
Then the certificates (and not the private keys!) need to be exchanged between
the hosts, e.g. with
	scp /etc/ipsec.d/certs/hosta.pem hostb.example.com:/etc/ipsec.d/certs/
	scp hostb.example.com:/etc/ipsec.d/certs/hostb.com /etc/ipsec.d/certs/
from host A. The IPSec transport connection (that is, no subnets behind these 
hosts that should be tunneled) can be started from either side using 
"ipsec up to_hostb" (e.g. from host A).
Note that this example explicitly uses IKEv2 due to its nicer error messages.

A more complicated example is to connect a "roadwarrior" (e.g. laptop)
to an internal network wbile it is behind another NAT. On the gateway
side, i.e. for the internal network the roadwarrior should connect to,
the configuration block could look something like this:

conn roadwwarrior
        left=%defaultroute
        leftcert=gatewayCert.pem
        rightcert=laptopCert.pem  
        rightrsasigkey=%cert       
        leftrsasigkey=%cert        
        auto=add                   
        leftsubnet=10.0.0.0/24   
        rightsubnetwithin=0.0.0.0/0
        right=%any                 
        compress=yes               
        type=tunnel                
        dpddelay=30                
        dpdtimeout=120             
        dpdaction=clear            

On the laptop side, you could use something along the lines:

conn %default
        rightrsasigkey=%cert
        leftrsasigkey=%cert 
        authby=rsasig
        leftcert=laptopCert.pem
        leftsendcert=always
        leftsubnet=
        dpddelay=30
        dpdtimeout=120
        dpdaction=clear
        esp=aes128-sha1
        ike=aes128-sha1-modp2048

conn esys
        left=%defaultroute
        right=gateway.example.com
        rightsubnet=10.0.0.0/24
        rightcert=gatewayCert.pem
        auto=add

Then load these new configuration blocks on both sides using "ipsec reload" 
and, on the laptop, start the tunnel with "ipsec up mynetwork".
These configuration blocks assume host names "gateway" and "laptop" and an 
inner subnet of 10.0.0.0/24.

-- Rene Mayrhofer <rmayr@debian.org>, Sun, Jul 09 12:31:00 2006