File: README.RIGHT.NOW

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sysvinit 2.86.ds1-38+etchnhalf.1
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WARNING:

  This version of sysvinit is really different from the 2.50 and
  earlier version.

  Shutdown now puts the system into runlevel 6 (reboot), 0 (halt)
  or 1 (single user). This can cause unexpected results if you
  install the binaries from this release into Slackware distributions
  older than Slackware 3.0.

SUPPORTED DISTRIBUTIONS:

  The binaries from this package can be installed in:

  o Debian 1.3 and later
  o RedHat 3.x and later
  o Slackware 3.0 (UNTESTED but it might work - no complaints yet).
    Also read the INIT.README in the slackware/ directory.
  o Slackware 2.x: see the slackware/ directory

  Do not install any of the scripts from the debian/ directory unless
  you know what you are doing.

UNSUPPORTED DISTRIBUTIONS:

  o The rest :)

  If you have a non-supported system, please upgrade to the latest version
  of your distribution that supports the Linux 2.0.x kernel (probably
  the reason why you are installing this newer sysvinit).

  You might get away by installing *just* the "init" binary, and nothing
  else. Do _not_ replace your existing halt, reboot or shutdown programs.

HOW TO NON DESTRUCTIVELY TEST THE NEW INIT:

  Install *just* the init binary as /sbin/init.new. Now reboot the system,
  and stop your bootloader so you can give arguments on the command line.
  With LILO you can usually achieve this by keeping the SHIFT key
  pressed during boot up. Enter the name of the kernel image (for LILO,
  TAB shows a list) followed by the argument "init=/sbin/init.new".
  The name "init.new" is special, do not use something like "init.test".

  For example:

        boot: linux init=/sbin/init.new

  YOU CANNOT SHUTDOWN IN A CLEAN WAY AFTER THIS. Your best bet is to use
  the "-n" flag to shutdown. This is because init is not running as process #1
  if you use this method. Anyway, if this works, you can remove the old init
  and copy the new init into place.

DISCLAIMER:

  If it breaks you get to keep both pieces. If you want to run the latest
  Linux 2.0.x kernel and you can't get init to work just upgrade your entire
  distribution to a newer version that supports the 2.0.x kernel properly.