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NAME
    Wily - Perl extension for the Wily editor/user interface

ABSTRACT
    This is a Perl5 module that provides a (just about) object-
    oriented interface to the Wily editor/user interface. Perl
    client programs can connect to Wily, and send messages to it to
    manipulate the contents of Wily windows. Client programs can
    also request that Wily forwards particular kinds of events to
    the client program for processing.

    This module requires Perl 5.002 or later.

    THIS IS STILL AN ALPHA RELEASE OF THIS MODULE. Nasty things may
    happen if you use it. Sorry.

INSTALLATION
    The tar file should be unpacked within the top-level directory
    of your Wily distribution. This will create a directory "perl"
    at the same level as, say, Doc, wily, sam and misc. If you've
    unpacked somewhere else, just move the files across.

    Before you install this module, apply the patch in msg/rpc.patch
    - this patches ../wily/libmsg/rpc.c to define another function,
    fileno(). This allows you to select() on input from Wily.

    After that, installation is pretty simple:

            perl Makefile.PL
            make
            make test
            make install

    Note that running the tests requires that you've got an instance
    of Wily running (and it must be the same release of Wily that
    you've just compiled the module with.:-) ). Also, to do "make
    install", you will probably have to be root. That's life with
    Perl modules.

    If you've got any sense, and you're using wily. 0.12.11, you
    should also install the patch that is in wily.patch. This fixes
    a couple of problems with Wily's event handling - see HANDLING
    EVENTS.

SYNOPSIS
      use Wily;
      use Wily qw(...);

      $wily = new Wily;
      $win = $wily->create('/win/name');
      %wins = $wily->list();
      $id = $win->id();
      if ($win->isattached()) { ... }
      $win->setname('/mumble');
      $win->settools('foo bar baz');
      $win->attach($mask);
      $win = $wily->open($name, $id);
      $text = $win->read($p0, $p1);
      $win->replace($p0, $p1, $newtext);
      $win->exec($cmd);
      $win->goto($q0, $q1, $addr, $setdot);
      $length = $win->length();
      if ($win->wouldblock()) { ... }
      $msg = $wily->event();
      $msg = $win->event();
      $win->bounce($msg);
      $wily->bounce($msg);
      ($type, $msgid, $winid, $p0, $p1, $flag, $string) = unwrapmsg($msg);
      $msg = wrapmsg($type, $msgid, $winid, $p0, $p1, $flag, $string);
      $fd = $wily->fileno();
      $errmsg = $wily->errstr();

DESCRIPTION
  CONNECTING TO WILY

            $wily = new Wily;

    This connects to Wily. It doesn't do anything else, so you're
    not going to receive any events, or see any new windows appear.
    $wily is an object that you can use to communicate with wily,
    however.

    There is no disconnect operation: this happens automatically
    when the Perl process dies.

  CREATING NEW WINDOWS

            $win = $wily->create($winname);

    This returns a new object that you can use for performing
    operations on the window. The window should appear on Wily's
    screen immediately. You can use $win for sending messages to
    Wily immediately - see below. Right now, you can't specify
    whether the window refers to a real or virtual file.

    This method used to be called newwin(), but was renamed to
    open() as of 0.03. newwin() will still work, but you'll get a
    non-suppressable warning.

  LISTING EXISTING WINDOWS

            %list = $wily->list();
            or
            %list = $win->list();

    The returned hash is the paths of each window currently open in
    Wily, indexed by their window ids. Note that it doesn't matter
    whether you use the connection object or a window object to get
    the list.

  OPENING EXITING WINDOWS

            $win = $wily->open($name);
            $win = $wily->open($id);
            $win = $wily->open($name, $id);

    This method returns a window object that is connected to the
    named window, but not attached to it; you won't receive any
    events from it yet. You can use the window's name, id or both to
    specify the window to be opened.

    This method was briefly called oldwin(), which was pretty daft.
    It's also the reason why newwin() was renamed to create().

  WINDOW IDENTIFIERS

            $id = $win->id();

    This just returns the id of the current window. You only really
    need this for finding out the window's pathname, with the list()
    method above. Window objects will return their identifiers, but
    the connection object will return a fake ID (because it's not
    really a window). This ID has the value $MainCon, which you can
    reference if you include it in the "use" statement, or if you
    explicitly give the package name: $Wily::MainCon.

  CHANGING TAG LINES

            $win->setname($newname);
            $win->settools($newtools);

    These methods allow you to change the pathname or tool list for
    a window. They return true if successful. Note that the tool
    listing is a single string. It should probably be a list, but it
    isn't, at the moment.

  READING WINDOW TEXT

            $text = $win->read($p0, $p1);

    This method returns a single UTF string, containing the text
    between character offsets $p0 and $p1 ($p1 is the offset of the
    first character AFTER the returned range). If the read fails -
    such as because the range is invalid - the method returns undef.

  WRITING WINDOW TEXT

            $win->replace($p0, $p1, $newtext);

    This method is used for updating window contents. The text
    specified by the range $p0-$p1 is removed, and $newtext is
    inserted in its place. If $p0==$p1, this is just a simple
    insertion. If $newtext is the empty string, then this is just a
    deletion. Returns false if it fails.

  SEARCHING AND ADDRESSES

            $win->goto($q0, $q1, $addr, $setdot);

    A slightly more complex method, this. It's used for two things:
    resolving a textual address into a character offset range, and
    for setting dot. $q0 and $q1 specify the starting range for the
    search. $addr is the text to search for. It can be any Wily
    address:

        If Wily manages to find what you're searching for, it sets
        the values of $q0 and $q1 to its address. If $setdot is also
        true, it also moves the window's current selection to be
        where the matched text is.

        Returns true if the pattern is found, and false otherwise.

        There are a couple of bugs in this method. The first is that
        you should be able to specify that dot will be used, and
        that $q0 and $q1 are ignored. The second is that if the
        address happens to reference a different window, it should
        return the window id of the new window.

  WINDOW CONTENTS LENGTH

                $len = $win->length();

        This method is just a wrapper around goto(), but it seems to
        be quite handy.

  SENDING COMMANDS TO WILY

                $win->exec($cmd);

        Runs $cmd in the context of the window. $cmd can be a shell
        command, or it can be a Wily builtin. Returns false if
        something doesn't work.

  HANDLING EVENTS

  Attaching

        Initially, window objects aren't attached to the window
        they're associated with. This means that Wily handles all
        events itself. To start receiving events for a window you've
        created, use:

                $win->attach($mask);

        Mask specifies which events you're interested in. The events
        are:

            Just add the events that you're interested in together,
            as in:

                    $win->attach($WEexec + $WEgoto);

            Again, name the events in the "use" statement, or use
            $Wily::WEexec, etc.

            Attach returns true for success, and false for failure.

            To attach to an existing window, use:

                    $win = $wily->open($id);
                    $win->attach($mask);

            where $id is the ID (or the name) of the window you want
            to attach to. The resulting object is an attached window
            object (or undef, if something goes wrong).

            Version 0.02 used a method called attachid(), which
            turned out to just a fairly limited improvement over
            version 0.01 - you could attach to windows just created
            with newwin(), but not to existing windows. attachid()
            has been replaced by a combination of open() and
            attach(); attachid() will still work, but you'll get a
            non-suppressable warning message.

            Wily will send goto and exec events directly to your
            client, without any processing. In contrast, replace
            events will already have been processed when you receive
            them; Wily is merely informing you of their occurrence.
            I'm not sure when wily sends destroy events; so far,
            I've never seen one. :-)

  Wily patch

            The wily.patch file contains a patch to
            ../wily/external.c - it fixes two problems. The first is
            that Wily 0.12.11 didn't expect any clients to bounce
            WEreplace events (after all, Wily's already processed
            them), so it didn't check for them. The result was that
            it reports them as unknown events. This patch just makes
            Wily ignore them. The other problem is that Wily echoes
            WEreplace events back to the client that sent them in
            the first place, if that client is attached to the
            window. This is a little silly, and means that clients
            have to be extremely careful about event handling. This
            patch stops Wily doing this, so you know that if you
            *cause* the event, you're not going to be notified about
            it too.

  Detaching

                    $status = $win->isattached();

            This method is to determine whether you're attached to
            the window. The Wily.pm module is supposed to notice the
            destroy events coming in from Wily, and mark the window
            object as detached, but since Wily doesn't seem to send
            these events, this doesn't work at the moment. As for
            explicitly detaching, there ISN'T a method for doing
            that. Nor, apparently, can you change the set of events
            you want to receive.

  Accepting events

            You receive events with:

                    $msg = $win->event();

            The returned value is an anonymous hash containing the
            components of the message. The keys are:

    't' - the message type.
    =item 'm' - message ID.
    =item 'w' - window ID.
    =item 'p0' and 'p1' - the range.
    =item 'f' - the flag.
    =item 's' - the string.
            so you can do:

                    if ($msg->{'t'} == $WEexec && $msg->{'s'} eq 'Del') {
                            ...
                    }

            The event() method blocks until it receives an event, so
            you can use:

                    $win->wouldblock()

            which returns true if event() would block.

            For both event() and wouldblock(), if you call them from
            a window object, they'll only consider events for that
            window. If you call them from the connection object,
            they'll return events for any windows. WARNING: This is
            untested functionality - I *think* it'll queue events
            for other windows properly, but I haven't had a chance
            to check it yet. Also, bear in mind that if you have
            several windows accepting events, you should make sure
            that you read events for other windows eventually, to
            drain the queues.

            In the returned hash, 't' is a numeric value, equal to
            one of the four event types given previously. 'm' is the
            identifier of the message. I don't think it's actually
            useful, but Wily might pay attention to it in bounces -
            I'm not sure.

            'w' is the window identifier of the window this event
            occurred in. This is necessary if you've got more than
            one window attached at once, and you're reading with the
            connection object, instead of the window object.

            'p0' and 'p1' are range involved:

                In both exec and goto events, the range will have
                been expanded by Wily to something sensible, if it
                was a single-click event.

                Offhand, I can't remember what 'f', the flag
                signifies, in events.

                's' is the inserted text, for replace events, the
                command to be executed in exec events, or the
                pattern to be searched for, in goto events.

                If you don't like using the returned hash, you can
                break it up into a list, using the function
                "unwrapmsg":

                        ($type, $msgid, $winid, $p0, $p1, $flag, $string) = unwrapmsg($msg);

                Note that this isn't a method, which means that you
                have to name it in the "use" statement, or precede
                it with "Wily::".

  Bouncing events

                It's quite common that you're only interested in
                specific instances of a kind of event. For example,
                with exec events, you probably only care about the
                commands your client supports. The bounce() method
                allows you to send an event back to wily, if you're
                not interesting in handling it:

                        $win->bounce($msg);
                        $wily->bounce($msg);

                It doesn't matter whether you use the connection
                object or a window object - the information needed
                is all in the message anyway.

                If you to construct the message yourself, you can
                use the function "wrapmsg":

                        $msg = wrapmsg($type, $msgid, $winid, $p0, $p1, $flag, $string);

                Again, this is a function, not a method, so you'll
                have to import it.

WAITING ON MULTIPLE INPUT SOURCES
                If you need to select() on Wily's connection,
                because you've got other input sources to worry
                about, then you can use:

                        $fd = $wily->fileno();

                This will return a file descriptor that you can use
                with vec() and select() in the normal Perl way. Note
                that this relies on a small modification to
                libmsg/rpc.c, so you have to apply the patch in the
                file msg/rpc.patch before it'll work (or, in fact,
                compile).

ERROR MESSAGES
                The errstr() method is supposed to return any error
                messages generated by libmsg, but it doesn't appear
                to be too reliable. Is that ironic, or what?

                        print "Everything's broken: " $wily->errstr(), "\n";

DEBUGGING
                If you set $Wily::Debugging = 1, then you'll get
                buckets of diagnostics from the Perl module. If you
                define -DWILYPERLDEBUG in the Makefile.PLs, and
                rebuild *everything*, you'll get a little more from
                the underlying C code, but nothing startling.

TESTING
                The test script, test.pl, attempts to exercise some
                of the module's functionality in a controlled way.
                It doesn't try out everything, because I can't think
                of a way of testing some of the methods where I can
                confirm their results reliably.

                You should have an instance of Wily running when you
                do "make test", and the Wily version must be the
                same as the one you originally linked the Wily
                module with, otherwise they probably won't talk to
                each other.

                Also check at the beginning of the script, for where
                it sets the value of $WILYFIFO:

                # $
Steve_Kilbane@cegelecproj.co.uk