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xsysinfo 1.7-9
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README for xsysinfo version 1.6.


WHAT IS XSYSINFO:

  Xsysinfo is an X application to display some Linux kernel parameters in
  graphical form. It is like a mix of top, free and xload with the difference
  that the values are shown in form of a horizontal bar. The displayed values
  are: CPU load average, CPU load, memory and swap sizes (details see below).

  Xsysinfo 1.6 runs at least under Linux 0.99pl5 with the proc filesystem (as
  kernels from this release on support the CPU idle time, no patch is
  necessary like in earlier versions of xsysinfo). Starting with version 1.3,
  xsysinfo also supports the new /proc/meminfo-format used in kernels >= 1.3.x


FOR THE IMPATIENT:

  If you want to take a look at xsysinfo, before you decide to install it,
  make sure the proc fs is mounted at /proc, then just type:

	XAPPLRESDIR=. xsysinfo &


HOW TO INSTALL:

  There is a compiled ELF-version of xsysinfo included in the archive, which
  was built under RedHat 4.2 with XFree86 3.3.1 and libc 5.3.12. If you want
  to install this binary just type

	make install

  as root. xsysinfo runs under normal (755) permissions, so you don't have to
  make it setuid/setgid.

  NOTE: Use this way to install xsysinfo! `make install' not only copies the 
  binary to the right place, it also installs the system wide application 
  defaults file (XSysinfo). Without this file you'll get a running xsysinfo,
  but it won't look very nice... 

  If you want to create your own compiled version just type:

	xmkmf
	make clean
	make

  (you'll need the programming package and the libraries from the XFree
  distribution to do this.)
  Now you can install it as described above.

  Xsysinfo requires that the proc filesystem is compiled into the kernel
  (this is the default anyway) and that it is mounted on directory /proc.
  To check this just do an `ls' on /proc, which should give something like
  this:

	$ ls /proc
	1/       21/      27/      39/      42/      52/      kmsg     uptime
	14/      22/      28/      4/       44/      75/      loadavg
	15/      23/      29/      40/      46/      87/      meminfo
	20/      24/      38/      41/      47/      self/    version

  To mount the proc filesystem, add the following line to your /etc/fstab:

  none            /proc           proc    defaults        # proc fs


WHAT IS DISPLAYED:

  Xsysinfo displays the following values:

    - CPU load average
	CPU load average between 0.000-8.000. The gauge's bar is subdivided
	into segments, where one segment represents a load value of 1.0. The
	bar's full length is automatically scaled, depending on the displayed
	value:

		load value (l)		full length	# segments
		------------------------------------------------------
		0.00 <= l < 1.00	1.00		1
		1.00 <= l < 2.00	2.00		2
		2.00 <= l < 3.00	3.00		3
		... and so on ...

  - CPU load
	percentage CPU load time to CPU idle time subdivided in three segments:
	user load, system load and nice load.

  - Memory
	The memory gauge's bar is subdivided into two segments with following
	values (from left to right):

	o  amount of physical memory, which is used by processes

	o  physical memory used for the page and buffer cache

	The length of the whole bar, which is the sum of these two values,
	shows the amount of physical memory currently used by the system.

  - Swap
	The percentage of swap space used by the system to total amount of
	swap space.


COMMAND LINE OPTIONS:

  Xsysinfo accepts the following command line options:

	-update <n>                     set update rate to <n> milli-seconds
	-title   (-notitle)             show (don't show) title string
	-labels  (-nolabels)            show (don't show) gauge labels
	-loadavg (-noloadavg)           show (don't show) CPU load average value
	-load    (-noload)              show (don't show) CPU load value
	-mem     (-nomem)               show (don't show) Memory info
	-swap    (-noswap)              show (don't show) Swap info
	-help                           show this message

  You can also specify any of the standard toolkit options (see: manpage X(1)).


CONFIGURATION:

  As the most X programs, xsysinfo is highly configurable. There are two
  resource files: XSysinfo with color independent settings and XSysinfo-color
  with color resources. The latter is automatically loaded, if your server 
  is set up to use color customized resource files. To do this just add 

  *customization: -color

  in your server resource file loaded by xrdb at startup (usually 
  /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/xinit/.Xresources).


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:

  Thanks to Linus and the other kernel hackers, who made Linux to this great
  OS. Also thanks to Muhammad M. Saggaf for his suggestions and ideas for this
  xsysinfo release. And last but not least thanks to Lucas Bussmann and 
  Joerg Fries for creating the color resources.


COMMENTS:

  Xsyinfo is written by Gabor Herr (herr@iti.informatik.th-darmstadt.de) and
  currently maintained by Ronald Wahl (ronald.wahl@informatik.tu-chemnitz.de).
  Comments, bug reports, whishes etc... are welcome.

  Have fun watching the kernel...

Gabor & Ronald

5/4/99 Mike Mondragon <dragon@gocougs.wsu.edu> added SMP support to version 1.7