File: zkg.config

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zkg 2.11.0-1
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# This is an example config file for zkg to explain what
# settings are possible as well as their default values.
# The order of precedence for how zkg finds/reads config files:
#
# (1) zkg --configfile=/path/to/custom/config
# (2) the ZKG_CONFIG_FILE environment variable
# (3) a config file located at $HOME/.zkg/config
# (4) if none of the above exist, then zkg uses builtin/default
#     values for all settings shown below

[sources]

# The default package source repository from which zkg fetches
# packages.  The default source may be removed, changed, or
# additional sources may be added as long as they use a unique key
# and a value that is a valid git URL.  The git URL may also use a
# suffix like "@branch-name" where "branch-name" is the name of a real
# branch to checkout (as opposed to the default branch, which is typically
# "main" or "master"). You can override the package source zkg puts
# in new config files (e.g. "zkg autoconfig")  by setting the
# ZKG_DEFAULT_SOURCE environment variable.
zeek = https://github.com/zeek/packages

[paths]

# Directory where source repositories are cloned, packages are
# installed, and other package manager state information is
# maintained.  If left blank or with --user this defaults to
# $HOME/.zkg. In Zeek-bundled installations, it defaults to
# <zeek_install_prefix>/var/lib/zkg/.
state_dir =

# The directory where package scripts are copied upon installation.
# A subdirectory named "packages" is always created within the
# specified path and the package manager will copy the directory
# specified by the "script_dir" option of each package's zkg.meta
# (or legacy bro-pkg.meta) file there.
# If left blank or with --user this defaults to <state_dir>/script_dir.
# In Zeek-bundled installations, it defaults to
# <zeek_install_prefix>/share/zeek/site.
# If you decide to change this location after having already
# installed packages, zkg will automatically relocate them
# the next time you run any zkg command.
script_dir =

# The directory where package plugins are copied upon installation.
# A subdirectory named "packages" is always created within the
# specified path and the package manager will copy the directory
# specified by the "plugin_dir" option of each package's zkg.meta
# (or legacy bro-pkg.meta) file there.
# If left blank or with --user this defaults to <state_dir>/plugin_dir.
# In Zeek-bundled installations, it defaults to
# <zeek_install_prefix>/lib/zeek/plugins.
# If you decide to change this location after having already
# installed packages, zkg will automatically relocate them
# the next time you run any zkg command.
plugin_dir =

# The directory where executables from packages are linked into upon
# installation.  If left blank or with --user this defaults to <state_dir>/bin.
# In Zeek-bundled installations, it defaults to <zeek_install_prefix>/bin.
# If you decide to change this location after having already
# installed packages, zkg will automatically relocate them
# the next time you run any zkg command.
bin_dir =

# The directory containing Zeek distribution source code.  This is only
# needed when installing packages that contain Zeek plugins that are
# not pre-built.  The legacy name of this option is "bro_dist".
zeek_dist =

[templates]

# The URL of the package template repository that the "zkg create" command
# will instantiate by default.
default = https://github.com/zeek/package-template

[user_vars]

# For any key in this section that is matched for value interpolation
# in a package's zkg.meta (or legacy bro-pkg.meta) file, the corresponding
# value is substituted during execution of the package's `build_command`.
# This section is typically automatically populated with the
# the answers supplied during package installation prompts
# and, as a convenience feature, used to recall the last-used settings
# during subsequent operations (e.g. upgrades) on the same package.